Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Seven Objects in a Box’, 1966, Joseph K. Levene Fine Art, Ltd.

Contents include:
Tom Wesselmann
Great American Nude
vacuum formed plastic
7 1/2"x 7" x 1 1/3 inches

George Segal
Chicken
cast acrylic and fiberglass
19½ x 13¾ x 4¼ inches

Allan D'Arcangelo
Side-View Mirror
7½ x 4 x 4 inches
screenprint on plexiglass set into chrome side-view mirror mounted on acrylic base

Andy Warhol
Kiss
Screenprint on plexiglass.
12.5" x 8 inches
Signature embossed and number incised on plexiglass mount.

Jim Dine
Rainbow Faucet
2 5/8 x 3 3/4 x 5 1/2 inches
sand-cast aluminium, dipped in acrylic paint

Claes Oldenburg
Baked Potato
4 1/8 x 4 7/8 x 8 1/4 inches (potato)
1 3/16 x 10 1/2 x 7 1/8 inches (plate)
cast resin with acrylic paint and porcelain plate

Roy Lichtenstein
Sunrise
8½ x 11 x 1 inches
baked enamel in colors, on metal plaque, signed in ink on the verso

Series: 7 Objects in a Box

Manufacturer: Tanglewood Press, Inc., New York

Another 7 Objects In a Box Set in collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York:
http://www.moma.org/collection/object.php?object_id=60439

Rosa Esman, New York

About Roy Lichtenstein

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

American, 1923-1997, New York, New York, based in New York and Southampton, New York