Salvador Dalí, ‘Birth of a New Human’, ca. 1970, Leviton Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Birth of a New Human’, ca. 1970, Leviton Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Birth of a New Human’, ca. 1970, Leviton Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Birth of a New Human’, ca. 1970, Leviton Fine Art

"The Birth of a New Human" - Limited edition, patinated and enameled bronze sculpture by Guillermo Castano based on and inspired by Salvador Dali's famous work, "Geopolitical Child Watches The Birth Of The New Man." This statue is large, 22" tall and 14" wide, comes on a marble base making it 30" high, and was created using the "lost wax method." Inscribed in the cast with the names of both the creator of the image, Dali, and the sculptor Castano, the piece also has a copyright stamp and date. There were 100 of these made, This is 40/100. Ships free in the US.

Mexican sculptor, Castano, (born Guillermo Castaño Ramírez) casts his own sculptures in bronze, using the ‘lost wax’ process and creates his own patinas. Castano has also created sculptures inspired by the work of other Master Artists such as Pablo Picasso and Marc Chagall.

Salvador Dali (1904-1989, Spain) One of the greatest surrealists of our time, best known for his ability to translate dreams into artwork. He was a painter, sculptor, filmmaker, writer and may have just wanted people to believe he was insane. He dedicated his life to proving he was a genius.

Signature: Signed/Numbered

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain