Salvador Dalí, ‘Ceci n’est pas une assiette ’, 1970, Fairhead Fine Art Limited
Salvador Dalí, ‘Ceci n’est pas une assiette ’, 1970, Fairhead Fine Art Limited
Salvador Dalí, ‘Ceci n’est pas une assiette ’, 1970, Fairhead Fine Art Limited

Dali’s contribution to the art of glassmaking is dominated by his collaboration with Daum, which began in the 1960’s and lasted nearly 20 years. Dali was on good terms with Jacques Daum who interpreted the surrealistic artists without question. The artist made a considerable number of glass objects. The expression “This is not a plate” playfully responds to fellow surrealist Magritte’s 1929 painting of a pipe inscribed “This is not a pipe”

Signature: signed by the artist recto

Manufacturer: Daum, France

Public Collections
Guggenheim Museum (New York, NY)
Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago, IL)
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (San Francisco, CA)
Salvador Dali Museum (St. Petersburg, FL)
Public Exhibitions:
Musee Dali a l’espace Montmartre, 20/5/1993

Robert & Nicolas Descharnes “Dali: The Hard and the soft” Number 323 (Page 130)
Clothilde Bacri , Published by Michel Aveline, 1992 : “Daum” pages 244/245

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain