Salvador Dalí, ‘Christ of Saint John of the Cross (Cristo de San Juan de la Cruz)’, ca. 1973, Robin Rile Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Christ of Saint John of the Cross (Cristo de San Juan de la Cruz)’, ca. 1973, Robin Rile Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Christ of Saint John of the Cross (Cristo de San Juan de la Cruz)’, ca. 1973, Robin Rile Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Christ of Saint John of the Cross (Cristo de San Juan de la Cruz)’, ca. 1973, Robin Rile Fine Art

Ships in two pieces. Numbered #5/8 of a total edition of 12 bronzes.

Original wax was created by Dali c. 1973/74 at a size of 31cm.

Edition certified by Robert Descharnes and re-ratified by Gala-Salvador Dali Foundation in Figueras, Spain. This image of Saint John of the Cross, is without a doubt, the best known of all Dali's religious works. The work was inspired by a drawing by Saint John of the Cross who experienced this rapturous vision of Christ and which is kept in the Monastery of the Incarnation in Avila [Spain]. Dali believed Saint John of the Cross to be "the greatest lyric exponent of this Spanish mysticism which I now bring back to life".
“From far-off times, people have been and still are, afraid of the fallen head of Jesus dead. But this devotion, this fearful piety, is felt by the people only in its tragic and cruel reality, never in its holiness and greatness…. We can appreciate that every representation of Christ in the cross, emphasizes the blows, the bruises, the marks, the spears, the horrible muscular contractions…. There is not one Passion which depicts the God; they only show the man… This is because nobody can depict the fallen but victorious God, because there exists no human brain that can understand such great concept….” Garcia Lorca The Christs [1918]

Signature: Signed and numbered in cast

Manufacturer: 2049 Obra Contemporanea for Salvador Dali

Descharnes, Robert & Nicolas "Le Dur et le Mou" catalogue, pg. 168-169, Ref #427-429

Private Collection, EU

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain