Salvador Dalí, ‘"From the Cliff of Creuse Cape": Autograph PostCard by Dalì’, 1934, Wallector
Salvador Dalí, ‘"From the Cliff of Creuse Cape": Autograph PostCard by Dalì’, 1934, Wallector
Salvador Dalí, ‘"From the Cliff of Creuse Cape": Autograph PostCard by Dalì’, 1934, Wallector
Salvador Dalí, ‘"From the Cliff of Creuse Cape": Autograph PostCard by Dalì’, 1934, Wallector

C.P.A.S.s.l.n.d.(Carte postale autographe sans lieu ni date) Autograph Signed Postcard neither place nor date, written by Gala, on behalf of Dalì to the Countess A.L.Pecci-Blunt. Postcard Dim: 9 x 14,1 cm, complete with red envelope (11,4 x 14,8 cm).Cadaques, Port Ligat (Spain), 28 October 1934, as the postmark shows. In French. Final greetings and the whole Dalì’s authentic signature: “su amigo Salvador Dalì”. Signed by Gala too. Excellent condition except a tiny mark and lightly browned paper in lower edge.

From the Cliff of Creuse Cape, where Pyrenees fall into the sea, Dali’s childhood mythical place, his wife Gala writes this postcard to the Countess Anna Laetitia Pecci-Blunt, on behalf of the Catalan artist. They are in the peacefull and lovely Port Ligat, but before their departure they tried to reach her by phone without success and will try again when they will be back. Gala informs her that Dalì has the project of going to New York for his exposition, dated on 20 November in New York and after in other towns”. Dalì is always in a creative excitement, with more projects and in perpetual rise: he’s going to live the “American dream”.

Catalonia, both wealthy and proud, always had a special importance in Dalì’s cultural and visual development, and, for all his life, and was a source of inspiration. Port Ligat is where he chose to build his home (it was originally a fisherman’s shack) as an adult, together with Gala, his wife and his long-life companion and muse.

Reference: F. NICOSIA, Dalì, il Giornale, Milano, 2006, p. 42.

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain