Salvador Dalí, ‘Le Cabinet Anthropomorphique’, 1982, New River Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Le Cabinet Anthropomorphique’, 1982, New River Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Le Cabinet Anthropomorphique’, 1982, New River Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Le Cabinet Anthropomorphique’, 1982, New River Fine Art

"The anthropomorphiquc Cabinet is an eponym derived from the 1936 drawing and his preparatory study, The City of Drawers. In Dali's oeuvre, figures with drawers are almost as well known as soft watches - The Venus with Drawers or The Anthropomorphic Cabinet are good examples. In oder to better grasp this figure who sits up on the floor, Dali did several strong preliminary drawings with pencil and pen. Because Dali greatly admired Freud over many years, he wanted to represent the psychoanalytical theories of the Vienese professor with this image. Dali said of this subject, "They are sorts of allegories destined to illustrate a certain complaisance to smell the innumerable narcissistic odors that emanate from each one of our drawers." Later he noted, "The only difference between immortal Greece and our contemporary era is Sigmund Freud, who discovered that the human body which was purely Neo-Platoniist at the time of the Greeks, is today filled with secret drawers that only psychoanalysis is capable of opening."

  • Robert & Nicholas Descharnes, "Dali, the Hard and the Soft, Sculptures and Objects"

Signature: Signed

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain