Salvador Dalí, ‘LES "JE MANGE GALA"’, 1971, Gallery Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘LES "JE MANGE GALA"’, 1971, Gallery Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘LES "JE MANGE GALA"’, 1971, Gallery Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘LES "JE MANGE GALA"’, 1971, Gallery Art

Salvador Dalí’s cookbook Les Diners de Gala (1973) opens with the warning: “If you are a disciple of one of those calorie-counters who turn the joys of eating into a form of punishment, close this book at once; it is too lively, too aggressive, and far too impertinent for you.” Named for his wife Gala, Dalí’s cookbook reflects the artist’s lifelong dream of becoming a chef and features 136 extravagant recipes for dishes like Thousand Year Old Eggs, Cytherean Meatballs, and more. Dalí also created a series of illustrations for the cookbook that depict his indulgent treats, but with a surrealist twist. For example, Dalí’s portrayal of a crayfish tower appears delicious, until a closer inspection reveals the upper body of Joan of Arc, arms gushing blood atop the feast.

From Les Diners De Gala. Photo lithograph with a separate original engraving titled Spoon on Crutches. Image size 18.9 x 22.44 inches. Engraving size 2.68 x 9.29 inches. EA edition. Authenticated on verso by Frank Hunter. Additional images are available upon request. Certificate of Authenticity included. All reasonable offers will be considered.

Signature: Hand signed and numbered by the artist.

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain