Salvador Dalí, ‘MÉTAMORPHOSE TOPOLOGIQUE DE LA VÉNUS DE MILO TRAVERSÉE PAR LES TIROIRS’, 1964, Robin Rile Fine Art

Sigmund Freud's Psychoanalytical theory recognizes the necessity in developing certain controls over the uninhibited expression of human fantasies. Salvador Dali likened these controls to storing desires in "anthropomorphic cabinets" "Metamorphose Topologique de la Venus de Milo" explores the feminine sensuality as being hidden from polite society in drawers which permeate and intersect every part of her.... Her mind, her gut, her sex. Edition of 8 plus 4 proofs. Will be sold with a certification from Nicolas Descharnes.

Signature: Signed and numbered in cast

Manufacturer: Airaindor–Valsuani

. and N. Descharnes, Dalí, The Hard and the Soft, Spells for the Magic of Form, Sculptures & Objects, Paris, 2004, p. 38, no. 71 (another cast illustrated in color).

Private Collection, EUROPE

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain