Salvador Dalí, ‘Nostalgic Postcard by Dalì to Countess Pecci-Blunt’, 1935, Wallector
Salvador Dalí, ‘Nostalgic Postcard by Dalì to Countess Pecci-Blunt’, 1935, Wallector

Handwritten, signed postcard by Salvador Dalì addressed to Contessa Anna Laetitia Pecci-Blunt. Sent from Cadaques, (Catalonia-Spain) on 3 September 1935. Postmark almost illegible. Contessa Pecci Blunt’s home address erased. Two postage stamps. (8.8 x 13.8 cm). In French. Signed by Gala and Dalì; handwriting Dalì’s. In perfect condition.

On return from the frenetic “Big Apple” where he often met with Louis Marcoussis and had great success with his “important” exhibition, he informed Contessa Pecci Blunt that New York was a city in “continuous motion”. But his words are filled with nostalgia as he recalls the peace of Cadaques, his home town in Spain, where, he says, he finds “idyllic luxury”. Catalonia, both wealthy and proud, always had special importance in Dalì’s cultural and visual development, and, for all his life he was always drawn there, to places he regarded as the centre of the world and as a source of inspiration, to spaces he felt filled with the mythical symbols of his childhood: Figueras, the Ampurdàn plain and the stretch of coastline from Cape Creuso to Estartit, in whose middle lies the promontory of Cadaques, where this postcard was sent from. Bathed in Mediterranean sunlight and dotted with anthropomorphous rocks, Dalì often used this landscape as a background and found in it a potent source of inspiration for his visionary paintings. Port Lligat is where he chose to make his home as an adult, together with Gala, his companion (in what was originally a fisherman’s shack). He also loved the beaches and sea views around Cadaques, which he remembered from summer holidays as a child with his family. Those flat, sandy landscapes very often appear in his work.

References:
F. NICOSIA, Dalì, Il giornale, Milano, 2006, p. 12.

Signature: Handwritten, signed postcard by Salvador Dalì addressed to Contessa Anna Laetitia Pecci-Blunt.

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain