Salvador Dalí, ‘Pegasus - Mythology series’, 1964, Galerie d'Orsay

Dalí illustrated Mythology by drawing very closely upon the symbolism of the ancient Greek legends. Using what he called “hazard objectif”(the meaningful manifestation of chance), he would often start with an abstract smudge, created in a single motion, and he developed his theme from this sign of Fate, like the Pythia of Delphi who interpreted the Oracle from the smoke coming out of the cave. This is particularly noticeable in his etchings entitled: “Œdipus and Sphinx”, “Theseus and Minotaurus”, “Jupiter”, “Pegasus”, and “The Milky Way”.

When Dalí worked on these plates, he experimented with all kinds of unusual tools like chisels, nails or wheels for the “Birth of Venus”, even a real octopus immersed in acid, which left its imprint on his “Medusa”.

Signature: Signed by artist and numbered in pencil lower margin

Publisher: Éditions Argillet, Paris

Michler/Lopsinger 116-131, Field 63-3

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain