Salvador Dalí, ‘SALIVASOFÁ’, 1972, DADA STUDIOS

SALIVASOFÁ
First Prototype Sofa Designed by Salvador Dalí & Oscar Tusquets, 1972.

The measurements are:
175x110x80cm

-The material in which it is manufactured is polyurethane foam coated with a red polidur coating.
The word DALI can be appreciated on the bottom left hand side, along with some creases to imitate lip creases.

The realization of the Salivasofá project began in 1972 when Oscar Tusquets proposed to Salvador Dalí to reproduce in three dimensions and to real scale the painting completed in 1936 called, “Retrato de Mae West pudiendo ser utilizado como sala de estar” (Portrait of the Mae West being used as a living room) in the Theater Museum (Teatro Museo) in Figueras.

In 1974, everything was prepared for the development and production of the Salivasofá which eventually never reached realization. Only six prototypes were ever made. We knew that one existed the one at the Mae West living Room in Dali’s Theater Museum in Figueas, until the awareness of this present sofa.

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain