Salvador Dalí, ‘Salvador Dali Rinocerontico Knob’, 2015, DADA STUDIOS

Knob Rinocerontico designed by Salvador Dali produced by BD design.

Three polished lacquered cast bronze pieces joined together.

Measures: 13 x 19 x 24 Hcm

During the 1930s in Paris, Salvador Dalí surrounded himself with a circle of friends involved in the application of art to varied disciplines, above and beyond the study of pure pictorial art. Jean-Michel Frank, a furniture maker and decorator of recognized prestige in the Paris of those years, was on very good terms with Dalí and together they worked on several ideas. The Bracelli lamp which we present here is a classic design after Jean-Michel’s manner of designing and working, adopted by Dalí for his house at Portlligat. Amongst Dalí ’s specific furnishing projects, and constituting another for his curriculum vitae as a designer, may be counted the garden furnishings for his Portlligat house, the complete architecture of the Night Club (garotte-shaped) for the Hotel Presidente in Acapulco (1957) and another project for a bar in California in the ‘forties. As shown by the small selection now produced and included in this catalogue, Dalí ’s work was not restrictes to the traditional furnishing elements, but included tap fittings, handles, door-pulls, printed fabrics and objets of indeterminate use. In the 1990s a group of experts, led by Oscar Tusquets, set themselves the task of turning the furniture Dalí had drawn for Jean-Michel Frank into reality. Amongst these items were the Leda chair and low table, taken from the painting “Femme à la tête rose” (1935).

Manufacturer: bd barcelona

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain