Salvador Dalí, ‘The Archangel Raphael (AKA The Angel of the Rock, The Angel of Redemption)’, 1945, Robin Rile Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘The Archangel Raphael (AKA The Angel of the Rock, The Angel of Redemption)’, 1945, Robin Rile Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘The Archangel Raphael (AKA The Angel of the Rock, The Angel of Redemption)’, 1945, Robin Rile Fine Art

Accompanied by the original certification of authenticity from Nicolas Descharnes, Ref# d1559_1945 (2018). Salvador Dali's relationship with organized religious was... complex. Growing up in a Spanish household, Catholicism was a central tenet to Dali's matriarchal upbringing. His father, however was a staunch atheist, bringing a tremendous duality to the young artist. As a Spaniard, Dali recognized his lineage as a Moorish descendant, so saints and angels venerated in each the Abrahamic religions of his Spanish homeland (Judaism,
Christianity and Islam) held a particular appeal to him.

The Archangel Raphael, known in Arabic as Isrāfīl (or "the Burning One") is said to have appeared in Cordova, Spain during the 16th century; an event commemorated each year on 7 May, a few days before #Dali's own birthday (11 May). Dali often analogizes his birth as a resurrection of his deceased older brother of the same name. The Angel blows a trumpet from Jerusalem's Dome of the Rock to announce this Day of Resurrection. Raphael then attends to the injured and infirm gathered around a pool of water in Bethesda. "An angel of the Lord descended into the pond; and the water moved. And he went down into the pond and, after the motion of the water, made whole whatsoever infirmity lay under" [John 5:1–4].

Because of this act, the angel Raphael became venerated as "Saint Raphael the Archangel", the Patron Saint of nurses; pharmacists and physicians. Dali depicts many aspects of Raphael as both Angel and Saint; tending to the injured in the foreground of this 1945 watercolor, pen and black ink on paper; and trumpeting the resurrection from the dome in the background.

Signature: Signed and dated in watercolor on the lower left "Gala Salvador / Dalí / 1945".

SOLD Sotheby's London, 13/03/1973, "Galliera", lot 11.; SOLD Hotel des Ventes Enghien, 13/12/1981, lot 145.;
SOLD Christie’s NY, 15/11/1989, "Mary 6958", lot 7.;
Private collection, Barcelona.; Private Collection, Europe.

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain