Salvador Dalí, ‘Triumph of the Toreador (Lillas Pastia's Tavern from Opera CARMEN)’, 1969, Robin Rile Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Triumph of the Toreador (Lillas Pastia's Tavern from Opera CARMEN)’, 1969, Robin Rile Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Triumph of the Toreador (Lillas Pastia's Tavern from Opera CARMEN)’, 1969, Robin Rile Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Triumph of the Toreador (Lillas Pastia's Tavern from Opera CARMEN)’, 1969, Robin Rile Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Triumph of the Toreador (Lillas Pastia's Tavern from Opera CARMEN)’, 1969, Robin Rile Fine Art
Salvador Dalí, ‘Triumph of the Toreador (Lillas Pastia's Tavern from Opera CARMEN)’, 1969, Robin Rile Fine Art

This work is accompanied by a copy of certification of authenticity from Robert Descharnes (Ref# D-968) This represents the Gold-Standard of certification for Dali, used by all major auctions.
Velasquez's towering masterpiece "Las Meninas" (1656), primarily depicts the infanta Margarita surrounded by maids and chaperones beside the painter himself working on a large canvas. The painting's mind-bending affects place the viewer in the viewpoint of the King and Queen (who are reflected in the mirror on the far wall) while being painted by Velasquez and attended by their daughter. A mysterious man lingers in the background. The painting, which hung in Spain's Museo Nacional del Prado during the lifetime of Dali, became a pilgrimage point any aspiring artist would undertake for intensive study. Velasquez's profound influence is found in Dali's paintings such as Velázquez Painting the Infanta Margarita with the Lights and Shadows of His Own Glory (1958), The Maids of Honour (Las Meninas) (1960), and Portrait of Juan de Pareja repairing a mandolin string (1960). In 1960 he took part in a group exhibition at the Sala Gaspar Gallery in Barcelona, entitled O figura. Homenaje informal a Velázquez, with a text that praises Velazquez, illustrated with a reproduction of Las Meninas. At the end of that same year he organized an exhibition at the Carstairs Gallery in New York under the title The Secret Number of Velázquez Revealed.

CIBO South Beach, Art Basel Miami Beach Exhibition, 2017.

Private Collection Sale: Sotheby's, New York, 8 November 2001, lot 294 Private Collection, New York Private Collection, Texas.

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain