An Embryonic Nation Rejoices: Thomas Paine arrives in Philadelphia, 30th November 1774

Thomas Paine arrives in Philadelphia, 30th November 1774
English-American political activist, political theorist and theologian. As the author of two highly influential pamphlets at the start of the American Revolution, he became one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. His ideas reflected Enlightenment era rhetoric of transnational human rights.
His principal contributions to the American Revolution were the widely read pamphlet Common Sense (1776), the all-time best-selling American book that advocated colonial America's independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain, and The American Crisis (1776–83), a pro-revolutionary pamphlet series.
Paine lived in France for most of the 1790s, becoming deeply involved in the French Revolution and defended the Revolution against its critics.
In 1802, he returned to America where he died on June 8, 1809. Only six people attended his funeral as he had been ostracized for his ridicule of Christianity.

About Sam Dargan

Figural painter Sam Dargan depicts history and society with a bleak and mirthless sense of humor. Dargan’s self-described subject is the misery of “middle management grunts, battered priests, hollowed-out delinquents,” but he explains that he is not critical of the figures so much as the systems of which they are part. His works frequently feature specific historical narratives, sourced from newspapers and history books; past subjects have included the Russian Revolution and the war in Iraq. Dargan, who studied at the Royal College of Art in London, paints with a precise and graphic style that has been described by critics as almost cartoon-like. He is inspired by painting traditions at the turn of the century, and of Russian realist landscape painters like Ivan Shishkin and Arkhip Kuindzhi, but remains fervently skeptical of Romanticism.

British, b. 1971, based in London, United Kingdom