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Sam Maloof

Oval cocktail table, No. 38, 1975

Walnut
18 3/4 × 49 1/4 × 9 1/4 in
47.6 × 125.1 × 23.5 cm
Bidding closed
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About the work
JMA
John Moran Auctioneers

Overall good condition with scattered scuffs, scratches, nicks, shrinkage cracks, and separation at …

Read more

Overall good condition with scattered scuffs, scratches, nicks, shrinkage cracks, and separation at joints commensurate with age. Totters slightly, very minor wear to the finish of the top.

Signature
Signed, numbered, and dated: Sam Maloof
Sam Maloof
American, 1916–2009
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In the 1960s furniture designer and master woodworker Sam Maloof was offered $22 million for the rights to mass-produce his work. He turned the offer down. A firm believer in the power of the handmade, Maloof was a leader in the California modern art movement. His sleek, minimal, and organic designs—joined using no nails or metal hardware—were included in the experimental Case Study Houses built around Los Angeles between 1945 and 1966 by progressive architects like Richard Neutra, Charles Eames, and Eero Saarinen, and his iconic rocking chair found a home at the White House. In 1985 he became the first craftsman to be awarded a MacArthur Foundation Genius Fellowship; he preferred to simply refer to himself as a woodworker until his death.

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About the work
JMA
John Moran Auctioneers

Overall good condition with scattered scuffs, scratches, nicks, shrinkage cracks, and separation at …

Read more

Overall good condition with scattered scuffs, scratches, nicks, shrinkage cracks, and separation at joints commensurate with age. Totters slightly, very minor wear to the finish of the top.

Signature
Signed, numbered, and dated: Sam Maloof
Sam Maloof
American, 1916–2009
Follow

In the 1960s furniture designer and master woodworker Sam Maloof was offered $22 million for the rights to mass-produce his work. He turned the offer down. A firm believer in the power of the handmade, Maloof was a leader in the California modern art movement. His sleek, minimal, and organic designs—joined using no nails or metal hardware—were included in the experimental Case Study Houses built around Los Angeles between 1945 and 1966 by progressive architects like Richard Neutra, Charles Eames, and Eero Saarinen, and his iconic rocking chair found a home at the White House. In 1985 he became the first craftsman to be awarded a MacArthur Foundation Genius Fellowship; he preferred to simply refer to himself as a woodworker until his death.

Sam Maloof

Oval cocktail table, No. 38, 1975

Walnut
18 3/4 × 49 1/4 × 9 1/4 in
47.6 × 125.1 × 23.5 cm
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
Other works by Sam Maloof