SAORI NAKAMISHI, ‘pink tubes’, 2009, Galerie Jacob Paulett
SAORI NAKAMISHI, ‘pink tubes’, 2009, Galerie Jacob Paulett
SAORI NAKAMISHI, ‘pink tubes’, 2009, Galerie Jacob Paulett
SAORI NAKAMISHI, ‘pink tubes’, 2009, Galerie Jacob Paulett
SAORI NAKAMISHI, ‘pink tubes’, 2009, Galerie Jacob Paulett

@galeriejacobpaulett
@studiocrazynoodles

Mint condition
Shipped from France

Signature: The artwork is signed by the Artist on verso of the canvas and stamped with the logo of the studio crazynoodles on verso of the canvas The artwork come accompanied with an original Certificate of Authenticity issued by the Studio of the Artist and signed by the Artist

@galeriejacobpaulett
@studiocrazynoodles

2016
KAWAI Show , Gallery 32 , TelAviv , Israel
Permanent Exhibition , Galerie Alain Daudet , Toulouse , France
Crazy noodles gang !!!!! , Opera Gallery Singapore , Singapore
​Collective Show, Guerrero Gallery , Miami, USA
Permanent Exhibition, TRIBES gallery, Tel Aviv , Israel
Permanent Presentation , Happy Art Gallery , Cannes , France
Collective Show , LTBart Gallery, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico
Nippon Neo Pop Show, ZK Gallery , San Francisco, USA
CrazyNoodles Show , Gallerie Ariel Jakob , Paris , France
Colorfull, Guerrero Fine Art , Barcelona, Sitges, Spain
Permanent Exhibition, TRIBES gallery, Tel Aviv , Israel

2015
Collective Show , Opera Gallery Dubai , Dubai , UAE
PandaSan ​and friends , SIBMAN Gallery , Paris , France
Permanent show , Gallery Bel Air Fine Art , Crans Montana, Switzerland
Icons PartII , Gallery 32 , TelAviv , Israel
Magnificient Contemporary Art , Opera Gallery Hong Kong , Hong Kong , China CrazyNoodles Show, Opera Gallery Singapore , Singapore
Collective Show, LTBart Gallery , Ciudad de Mexico , Mexico.

2014
Collective Show , Opera Gallery Hong Kong ,Hong Kong , China
Pop Sculptures , Opera Gallery Paris, Paris , France.
ColorFull , Galerie Ariel Sibony , Paris, France
Collective Show , Opera Gallery Singapore , Singapore
Permanent Presentation , Happy Art Gallery , Cannes , France
Icons , Gallery 32 , TelAviv , Israel
Collective Show , Galerie Absolute , Saint Paul de Vence , France
​This is Tokyo , SIBMAN Gallery , Paris , France
Permanent Exhibition , BelAirFineArt Geneve , Geneve , Switzerland
Opening Show LTBart Gallery, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico
Permanent Exhibition , Galerie Alain Daudet , Toulouse , France

2013
Permanent Exhibition Sculptures , Galerie SIBMAN , Paris France.
Nippon Pop Show , SIBMAN Gallery , Paris , France
Opening Collective Show , Gallery32 , telAviv, Israel.
Mad Show , Maddog Gallery , Ibiza , Spain
Permanent Presentation , Happy Art Gallery , Cannes , France

2012
Pop Art Show , Luca Fine Art , Verbier , Switzerland
Pop Show , Gallery Bel Air Fine Art , Crans Montana, Switzerland.
CrazyNoodles Show , Gallerie Ariel Jakob , Paris , France
Permanent Presentation , Happy Art Gallery , Cannes , France
Permanent Exhibition Sculptures , Galerie Ariel Sibony , Paris France.
AnyWhichWay , Galerie BelAirFineArt , Geneve , Geneve , Switzerland.

2011
Collective Show, Rize Art Gallery, Naarden, The Netherlands
Collective Show , Galerie Alain Daudet, Toulouse , France
CrazyNoodles Show , Galerie Marie Ricco , Calvi , France
Pop Art Show , Galerie des Lices, Saint Tropez , France.
Collective Show , Absolute Gallery, Brugge , Belgium.
Show CrazyNoodles , Sibman Gallery , Paris ,France
ColorFull , Galerie Ariel Sibony , Paris France.
ARTAMSTERDAM (ARTFAIR),RAI Edition 28 , Amsterdam , The Netherlands

2010
Nippon Neo Pop in Paris, Galerie Jacob Paulett, Paris, France
Manga in Amsterdam, Willem Kerseboom Gallery, Amsterdam , The Netherlands
Nippon Collective Show, Galerie Ariel Jakob, Paris, France
CrazyColors , Opera GALLERY, Paris, France
LILLE ART FAIR (ARTFAIR), Palais des Expositions de Lille, Lille, France
ARTAMSTERDAM (ARTFAIR),RAI Edition 26 , Amsterdam , The Netherlands

2009
Nippon 2009, Galerie Ariel Sibony, Paris, France
From Kyoto to Tokyo, Collective Show, Galerie JacobPaulett, Paris France
The World ... a Cartoon, Willem Kerseboom Gallery, Amsterdam , The Netherlands
Shogun in PokemonLand, Opera GALLERY, Geneva, Switzerland
ARTPARIS (ARTFAIR), GrandPalais, Paris, France
ARTAMSTERDAM (ARTFAIR),RAI Edition 25 , Amsterdam , The Netherlands
SCOPE BASEL(ARTFAIR), KASERN Basel, Basel, Switzerland
SCOPE NEW YORK (ARTFAIR), 355 West 36th Street, New York, USA
SLICK PARIS (ARTFAIR), le 104, Paris, France

2008
NeoPop Made in JAPAN, Galerie Ariel Sibony, Paris, France
Tokyo Express, Opera Gallery, London, UK
Inside Japan, La 5eme Galerie, Paris, France
Wonderland, , Japanese Contemporary Art Exhibition, Opera Gallery, Hong Kong, China
ARTLONDON (ARTFAIR), Royal Hospital, London, UK

@galeriejacobpaulett
@studiocrazynoodles

和製ネオポップ・・・ナカミシ・サオリとアンドウ・ヒロ:漫画から生まれた造形世界とキッチュな遊びの美意識 クレイジーヌードルズ・スタ ジオは、ひとつの文化的土壌から生まれた様々な傾向の数人のアーティストを擁して、ひとつの創造的概念を共有する創作活動を組織しています。それは独創的 な概念を生み出し続けて全体として進化することで、「スタジオ」に絶えず新しい固有の輪郭を与えるという概念です。

Ever since the late 19th century, Japanese people of all ages enjoy manga and its precedents. In our century, this style expanded worldwide and the term is now used to refer comics coming from the land of the rising sun. Japanese artist Saori Nakamishi creates her work in the best tradition of this style.

Nakamishi’s Under-Aged Lolitas Done in Manga Tradition

Nakamishi studied Aesthetics and Art and upon graduation she decided to focus all of her talents on creating picturesque-looking illustrations, highly influenced by manga. Her work is mainly realistic, yet deeply involved with a manga aesthetics and themes. Nakamishi depicts sexy and beautiful under-aged Lolitas in many different situations. Erotic, but innocent images of these girls – with names like Cherry, Angel, Jewel or Heart – are surrounded by numerous fantastical creatures and various symbolic objects. The elements of the Japanese traditional culture are the main source of this artist’s concepts, combining thus old fashioned style with neo-pop.

Crazynoodles Studio

In 2005, Saori joined forces with her fellow colleague Hiro Ando, and together they created Crazynoodles studio, an artistic workshop dedicated to the promotion of young neo-pop artists inspired by manga and kitsch. Today, Crazynoodles represents 15 artists, distributed all around the world, from Paris to Tokyo and with a total freedom of expression. A collaboration between the artists is more than welcomed, and a result of it is moving borders in the artistic creations, establishing Crazynoodles artists on in the insurgency against the western, somewhat elitist, art.
Nakamishi keeps on going with her work, and the world outside Japan keeps trying to decipher it.

Saori Nakamishi lives in Japan.

What Is Kawaii?
The Japanese concept of kawaii—best translated as “cuteness”—has grown from a national trend to a global phenomenon. Sanrio’s Hello Kitty has been valued at $7 billion; the Oxford English Dictionary named an emoji its 2015 Word of the Year; and Nintendo’s Pokémon Go recently became the most downloaded game in smartphone history. The kawaii movement is wide in scope, spanning Manga comics, Harajuku fashion, and Takashi Murakami’s “Superflat” artworks, but what’s behind the aesthetic, and why is it so popular?
Japan’s culture of cute began in the 1970s with a youth movement developed by teenage girls, involving handwriting in a childlike style. The new script was given a variety of names, such as marui ji (round writing), koneko ji (kitten writing), and burikko ji (fake-child writing), and featured text with stylized lines, hearts, stars, Latin characters, and cartoon faces. Many scholars cite this trend as a reaction against the rigidity of post-World War II Japan, as the pursuit of kawaii enabled youth to find a sense of individuality and playfulness in an increasingly serious and depersonalized environment. While many schools initially banned this writing style, advertisers quickly caught onto the trend, using the new aesthetic to market products to the younger generation.
In 1974, the stationary company Sanrio launched the character of Hello Kitty, printing the now-iconic whiskered white cat on a vinyl coin purse. Forty-two years later, Hello Kitty has been placed on over 50,000 products in more than 70 countries, including toaster ovens, alarm clocks, airplanes, and even sex toys. In 2008, Japan named Hello Kitty as its tourism ambassador, an official invite to the rest of the world to join in on the adorability binge that is kawaii.
But Hello Kitty is not alone. In fact, each of Japan’s 47 governmental offices has its own kawaii mascot, such as the rosy-cheeked bear Kumamom for the bullet train and the wide-eyed Prince Pickles for the police force. Pokémon has developed another 700 kawaii creatures over the past 20 years, some of which are currently running virtually rampant in cyberspace. Emojis, bitmojis, and even those adorable Casper subway advertisements all take root in the kawaii philosophy.
While kawaii characters are diverse, spanning species both real and imagined, they often follow a basic formula. Kawaii creatures have limited facial features—two wide eyes, a small nose, and maybe a dot for the mouth—rendering them emotionally ambiguous and enabling viewers to project upon them. (For this reason, iPhone emojis have been criticized as not kawaii enough by some Japanese consumers because they feature a greater amount of emotional specificity.) Almost always outlined in black, kawaii characters are pastel-colored, graphically simple, and childlike. Designed to elicit a sense of nostalgia, they often feature big heads and little bodies in order to match the proportions of infants and baby animals.
Scholars have suggested that people grow attached to kawaii characters precisely because of their youthful nature, which elicits the evolutionary impulse to care for the young. “Hello Kitty needs protection,” the sociologist Merry White once explained. “She’s not only adorable and round, she’s also mouthless and can’t speak for herself.” Tamagotchis—a nostalgia-inducing timecapsule for those who came of age in the ’90s—are Japanese gadgets that epitomize this theory, as they require users to look after small digital pets that are sweet and helpless. Reportedly, some Pokémon Go users have opted out of evolving their pokémons, preferring to keep them in an infantile state rather than growing their powers.
The effect of the aesthetic is also to return us to a childlike state. Many from the so-called kawaii generation also desire to be kawaii themselves, whether through infantile voices or juvenile dress. For example, the kawaiitrend of “Lolita fashion” promotes a Victorian style of clothing, ripe with innocent-looking petticoats, ruffles, pastel colors, and large ribbons and bows. Whether Lolita-kawaii is named after Vladimir Nabokov’s controversial novel or is Japanese in origin, however, is still a hotly debated topic.
The Lolita aesthetic is not the only sub-brand of kawaii thriving today.Guro-kawaii (grotesque cute), ero-kawaii (erotic cute), kimo-kawaii (creepy cute), and busu-kawaii (ugly cute) have all emerged as alternatives to the more traditional style of Hello Kitty and Pikachu. Meanwhile, contemporary artists Murakami and Yoshitomo Nara have ushered kawaii into the fine arts, creating their own series of wide-eyed characters that range from the vapidly cute to the uncomfortably sinister.
In his paintings and sculptures, Murakami reminds viewers that the style of kawaii carries with it a certain darkness. His depictions of cartoon mushrooms, for example, appear entirely joyous at first glance, but also recall the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. For Murakami, the kawaii aesthetic acts as an enduring symbol of the infantilized nature of occupied Japan after World War II—a manner through which people found escape from the trauma of war.
Since its beginnings, the kawaii craze has been a rebellion against the seriousness of adulthood—a counterbalance to the harshness of the real world. Under the strain of a polarizing election cycle, it is perhaps no wonder why over 15 million people have decided to temporarily tune out the news for a dive into Pokémon Go. The app invokes the child within, encouraging users to find imaginary friends and care for them, or at least so I’ve heard. This writer is still at level one.
Sarah Gottesman

@galeriejacobpaulett
@studiocrazynoodles

This artwork come directly from the Artist's Studio , studio crazynoodles

About SAORI NAKAMISHI

Japanese, b. 1979, Tokyo, Japan, based in Tokyo, Japan