Sarah Morris, ‘Endeavor (Los Angeles), from Door Cycle’, 2006, Phillips
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Sarah Morris

Endeavor (Los Angeles), from Door Cycle, 2006

Screenprint in colours on industrial steel door panel.
83 1/10 × 35 7/10 × 1 4/5 in
211 × 90.8 × 4.5 cm
Bidding closed
About the work
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Phillips

Property Subject to Artist's Resale Right (see Conditions of Sale for further information)

From …

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Signature
Signed and numbered 'III/III AP' in black ink on the accompanying certificate (one of 3 artist's proofs aside from the edition of 15), …
Sarah Morris
American, b. 1967
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Since the mid-1990s, artist Sarah Morris has produced a large body of work using both painting and film, which create a new language of place and politics.

Morris’ paintings and films contain elements that complement and connect to one another, generating a constant back-and-forth play between the two. In her paintings, she uses colors and geometries that she associates with a city’s unique aesthetic vocabulary and palette, as well as its character and multiple histories. Within the framework, Morris’ work plays with social and bureaucratic typologies to implicate obstructive systems of control. In her films President Bill Clinton, Chase Bank, Philip Johnson, Robert Towne, the film industry, poster design, the Olympics, the banking system, Oscar Niemeyer, J.G. Ballard, perfume, lunar cycles, pharmaceutical packaging, birdcages and even fruit are all fair game.

In writer Bettina Funcke’s words: “She wants to be both author and protagonist, and to her that means using compromised personalities and places as portals into entanglements of power, generating a sense of dizzying simultaneity that she translates into motives and resources for her paintings and a flow of images for her films, all of which add up to topologies of a moment in the life of power and style.”

— Submitted by the artist’s studio

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About the work
Bibliography
P
Phillips

Property Subject to Artist's Resale Right (see Conditions of Sale for further information)

From the Catalogue:
"Between 1964 and 1966 Willem de Kooning painted a series of female figures on hollow-core wood doors, which were later exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art, March 14 through May 26, 1996. …

Medium
Signature
Signed and numbered 'III/III AP' in black ink on the accompanying certificate (one of 3 artist's proofs aside from the edition of 15), …
Sarah Morris
American, b. 1967
Follow

Since the mid-1990s, artist Sarah Morris has produced a large body of work using both painting and film, which create a new language of place and politics.

Morris’ paintings and films contain elements that complement and connect to one another, generating a constant back-and-forth play between the two. In her paintings, she uses colors and geometries that she associates with a city’s unique aesthetic vocabulary and palette, as well as its character and multiple histories. Within the framework, Morris’ work plays with social and bureaucratic typologies to implicate obstructive systems of control. In her films President Bill Clinton, Chase Bank, Philip Johnson, Robert Towne, the film industry, poster design, the Olympics, the banking system, Oscar Niemeyer, J.G. Ballard, perfume, lunar cycles, pharmaceutical packaging, birdcages and even fruit are all fair game.

In writer Bettina Funcke’s words: “She wants to be both author and protagonist, and to her that means using compromised personalities and places as portals into entanglements of power, generating a sense of dizzying simultaneity that she translates into motives and resources for her paintings and a flow of images for her films, all of which add up to topologies of a moment in the life of power and style.”

— Submitted by the artist’s studio

Sarah Morris

Endeavor (Los Angeles), from Door Cycle, 2006

Screenprint in colours on industrial steel door panel.
83 1/10 × 35 7/10 × 1 4/5 in
211 × 90.8 × 4.5 cm
Bidding closed
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