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Scott King

Untitled, 2017

Single colour screen print with gloss

15 7/10 × 11 2/5 in
40 × 29 cm
£120
Location
London
Have a question? Visit our help center.
About the work
Studio Voltaire
London
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Edition of 100


Edition of 100


Medium
Print
Signature
Signed on verso
Publisher
Studio Voltaire
Scott King
British, b. 1969
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Part Situationist revolt and part satire, Scott King’s works are a synthesis of art, design, and advertising, delivered with a pop sensibility. Best known for his screen prints of Madonna in Hitler drag (2003) and Cher’s face inserted into the ubiquitous Che image (2008), King fuses his mastery of a pop culture vocabulary with his cynicism about its consumerist nature by inventing pithy-sounding slogans, bereft of all meaning and sincerity. Among his series of fake Vogue covers entitled “How I’d Sink American Vogue” (2006), King included Kirsten Dunst Says Bombs Kill in large white letters against a black background, as well as a cover model in a black burqa. In addition to his text-based works, King has created dot print works, such as a series inspired by Joy Division concerts, where the ratio of band members to their fans is rendered in black dots, as in Joy Division, 2 May 1980, High Hall, The University of Birmingham, England (1999).

Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
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Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Studio Voltaire
London
Follow

Edition of 100


Edition of 100


Medium
Print
Signature
Signed on verso
Publisher
Studio Voltaire
Scott King
British, b. 1969
Follow

Part Situationist revolt and part satire, Scott King’s works are a synthesis of art, design, and advertising, delivered with a pop sensibility. Best known for his screen prints of Madonna in Hitler drag (2003) and Cher’s face inserted into the ubiquitous Che image (2008), King fuses his mastery of a pop culture vocabulary with his cynicism about its consumerist nature by inventing pithy-sounding slogans, bereft of all meaning and sincerity. Among his series of fake Vogue covers entitled “How I’d Sink American Vogue” (2006), King included Kirsten Dunst Says Bombs Kill in large white letters against a black background, as well as a cover model in a black burqa. In addition to his text-based works, King has created dot print works, such as a series inspired by Joy Division concerts, where the ratio of band members to their fans is rendered in black dots, as in Joy Division, 2 May 1980, High Hall, The University of Birmingham, England (1999).

Scott King

Untitled, 2017

Single colour screen print with gloss

15 7/10 × 11 2/5 in
40 × 29 cm
£120
Location
London
Have a question? Visit our help center.
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