Sebastião Salgado, ‘Site of the Now Dried Lake Faguibine, Mali’, 1985-printed later, Skinner
Sebastião Salgado, ‘Site of the Now Dried Lake Faguibine, Mali’, 1985-printed later, Skinner
Sebastião Salgado, ‘Site of the Now Dried Lake Faguibine, Mali’, 1985-printed later, Skinner
Sebastião Salgado, ‘Site of the Now Dried Lake Faguibine, Mali’, 1985-printed later, Skinner

1985, printed later.

Image Size: 13.25 x 20.375 in. (33.0 x 51.5 cm), matted, unframed.
Sheet Measures: 20 x 24 in. (50.7 x 60.9 cm).

At its fullest Lake Faguibine ranked among the largest lakes in West Africa, but since the Sahel drought in the 1970s and 1980s it has slowly dried up, making the traditional livelihoods of fishing, agriculture, and livestock herding impossible.—Courtesy of Skinner

Signature: Signed, inscribed, and dated "S. Salgado MALI..." in pencil on the verso c.l., embossed copyright stamp on the recto l.l.

About Sebastião Salgado

Sebastião Salgado travels the world documenting the poor and powerless, as well as the grandeur of nature, in analog black-and-white photographs that are both highly formal and unflinchingly documentary. Influenced by his training as an economist, and aligned with masters of documentary photography like Robert Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson, Salgado focuses on the adverse results of globalization. As he explains: “Each of my stories is about globalization and economic liberalization: a sample of the human condition on the planet today.” That condition is one of peril for those at the bottom of the global economy, as photographs like Legs, Serra Pelada, Brasil (1986) attest. In this photograph, Salgado hones in on the taut, muscular legs of Brazilian miners. Barely covered by sweat-drenched shorts, the men’s legs seem strong yet fragile, as Salgado captures them straining against an incline of bare earth.

Brazilian, b. 1944, Aimorés, Brazi, based in Paris, France