Sebastião Salgado, ‘Two Women Making an Offering to a Statue of a Goddess, Brazil’, 1980, Be-hold

SEBASTIÃO SALGADO “TWO WOMEN MAKING OFFERINGS TO A STATUE OF A GODDESS, BRAZIL,” 1980, printed 1991. Gelatin silver print, 10 7/8 x 7 3/8- inch image on 11 7/8 x 10 - inch sheet. Signed with “Brazil – 1980” in pencil verso, and dedicated to Ken Lassiter. It. comes from the collection of Ken Lassiter who produced a series of programs dealing with the work of some photographers. He became friends with Salgado, who gave him this print. Lassiter's note reads "Salgado was going to lecture at RIT and appear on the Techniques of the Masters for Kodak, so Ken went to Paris to make the arrangements and to tape him at work in his darkroom. We needed some images for the show and posters so he sat me down on his living room floor and brought stacks of his images for Ken to select from. What a thrill! Salgado knew how Ken admired this image so he signed and gave it to us when he came to dinner the night before the broadcast. Salgado was the first subject in Ken’s series of interviews in Photographers’ Forum Magazine"

Signature: signed and titled

from Ken Lassiter Collection

About Sebastião Salgado

Sebastião Salgado travels the world documenting the poor and powerless, as well as the grandeur of nature, in analog black-and-white photographs that are both highly formal and unflinchingly documentary. Influenced by his training as an economist, and aligned with masters of documentary photography like Robert Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson, Salgado focuses on the adverse results of globalization. As he explains: “Each of my stories is about globalization and economic liberalization: a sample of the human condition on the planet today.” That condition is one of peril for those at the bottom of the global economy, as photographs like Legs, Serra Pelada, Brasil (1986) attest. In this photograph, Salgado hones in on the taut, muscular legs of Brazilian miners. Barely covered by sweat-drenched shorts, the men’s legs seem strong yet fragile, as Salgado captures them straining against an incline of bare earth.

Brazilian, b. 1944, Aimorés, Brazi, based in Paris, France