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Seymour Fogel

NEW YORK NO. 1, 1936

Lithograph
9 × 13 in
22.9 × 33 cm
Bidding closed
About the work
Provenance
D
Doyle

Sheet16 5/8 x 12 5/8 inches; 422 x 321 mm.

with full margins, unframed.

Sheet16 5/8 x 12 5/8 inches; 422 x 321 mm.

with full margins, unframed.

Signature
Signed, dated, titled and numbered 5-12 in pencil
Seymour Fogel
American, 1911–1984
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In the course of a career spanning six decades, Seymour Fogel experimented with a variety of materials and formats, but he is best remembered for his optimistic imagery and his interest in depicting human emotions. He once said, “I paint what I feel and hope it arouses an awareness of a shared experience.” In his youth, Fogel worked as an apprentice to Diego Rivera for the Mexican artist’s mural projects. In the 1930s, Fogel was awarded several mural commissions of his own, which prominently featured the positive qualities of American institutions and communities. In his later career, however, Fogel’s style shifted away from representation toward abstraction, and what he called a purely emotional and intuitive way of working, or “atavistic art.”

Save
Save
view
View in room
share
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Save
Save
view
View in room
share
Share
About the work
Provenance
D
Doyle

Sheet16 5/8 x 12 5/8 inches; 422 x 321 mm.

with full margins, unframed.

Sheet16 5/8 x 12 5/8 inches; 422 x 321 mm.

with full margins, unframed.

Signature
Signed, dated, titled and numbered 5-12 in pencil
Seymour Fogel
American, 1911–1984
Follow

In the course of a career spanning six decades, Seymour Fogel experimented with a variety of materials and formats, but he is best remembered for his optimistic imagery and his interest in depicting human emotions. He once said, “I paint what I feel and hope it arouses an awareness of a shared experience.” In his youth, Fogel worked as an apprentice to Diego Rivera for the Mexican artist’s mural projects. In the 1930s, Fogel was awarded several mural commissions of his own, which prominently featured the positive qualities of American institutions and communities. In his later career, however, Fogel’s style shifted away from representation toward abstraction, and what he called a purely emotional and intuitive way of working, or “atavistic art.”

Seymour Fogel

NEW YORK NO. 1, 1936

Lithograph
9 × 13 in
22.9 × 33 cm
Bidding closed
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