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Sherrie Levine, ‘Metro Pictures, Inaugural Exhibition, Paper Invitation’, 1980, James Fuentes
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Metro Pictures, Inaugural Exhibition, Paper Invitation, 1980

Paper Invitation
7 1/2 × 7 1/2 in
19.1 × 19.1 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
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Location
New York
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About the work
Sherrie Levine
American, b. 1947
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Appropriation artist Sherrie Levine, a founding member of The Pictures Generation, is well known for her collections of photographs lifted directly from the work of mostly male modern masters, such as After Walker Evans (1981), After Stieglitz, After Cézanne (2007) and After August Sander (2012). Raising questions about originality and authenticity, Levine re-photographs, abstracts or digitizes these images, making them “ghosts” of the original images. “I want to put a picture on top of a picture,” Levine says. “This makes for times when both disappear and other times when they’re both visible.” Her sculptures and paintings examine similar concerns, as in polished bronze replicas of Marcel Duchamp's urinal or watercolors of famous paintings copied precisely from books, preserving distorted colors or reproductions in black and white.

Troy Brauntuch
American, b. 1954
Follow

A member of the Pictures Generation who showed with contemporaries Jack Goldstein, Robert Longo, and Sherrie Levine in the pivotal 1977 "Pictures" exhibition, Troy Brauntuch is well known for distinctive photo-based works and paintings created with Conté crayon on dark cotton. His subjects range from the ordinary (a cat, a dress, a stack of folded shirts) to the tragic (the 1990 Pan Am bombing), and include many representations of indirect Fascist imagery (as in silk-screened prints based on Hitler's architectural drawings).

Jack Goldstein
Canadian, 1945–2003
Follow

Jack Goldstein was a multimedia artist best known for his involvement with the Pictures Generation, and is considered a pioneer of sound art. One of his central interests was the notion of individualism in a media-saturated society. Over the course of his career, Goldstein worked with sculpture, performance, painting, and written text, but his most famous works were films. He worked with appropriated footage, which he would manipulate to highlight certain rhythms or details. Perhaps his most iconic work was Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (1975), which featured MGM’s mascot roaring on loop. Over time, Goldstein’s techniques increasingly eradicated evidence of the artist’s own hand in the spirit of mass production. He began hiring people to paint his paintings, and others to produce his films and sound.

Thomas Lawson
British, b. 1951
Follow

When Tom Lawson moved to New York in 1975 to paint, he quickly became associated with the Pictures Generation—whose ranks include Cindy Sherman, Barbara Kruger, and Richard Prince—defined by their use of mass media images. Lawson usually culls his subjects from anonymous photographs, images from art history, and even newspaper clippings; from these, he selects sections that he combines in uncanny compositions with jarring colors. While Lawson is often lauded for the ironic humor or political undertones in these works, the artist is wary that “there is this terrible misunderstanding that I don’t like the media, when in fact the whole point is that I can’t get enough of it.”

William Leavitt
American, b. 1941
Follow

William Leavitt is now credited with laying the foundation for West Coast Conceptualism in the late 1960s and early 1970s, but he doesn’t exactly consider himself a conceptual artist. Leavitt prefers to think of himself as “a narrative specialist or something,” trying to “frame some story through an object or a painting or a situation that would lend itself to further narrative.” Leavitt’s diverse practice includes photography, painting, drawings, installation, audio, and performance. He draws from the domestic and industrial landscapes of Los Angeles, and often includes fragments of modernist architecture and references to popular culture. Leavitt is most interested in the relationships between the artificial and the natural, and the intersections of illusion and reality. In his own words, Leavitt entertains an ongoing exploration of “the theater of the ordinary.”

Robert Longo
American, b. 1953
Follow

Robert Longo burst onto the New York art scene as a brash 25-year-old with “Men in the Cities,” his iconic 1983 large-scale charcoal drawings of businessmen posing in uncanny contortions. “I always imagine that I want to make art that is going to kill you,” he said in 1984. “Whether it’s going to do it visually or physically, I’ll take either way.” Longo works and reworks his charcoal into thick-textured surfaces, giving his velvety drawings deep, blackened expanses and sharply contrasting whites; his forms are at once representational and softly elusive. Having been fascinated with popular culture as a child, Longo centers his practice on transposing images and the resulting transformation of meaning, linking him with the Pictures Generation. “An artist should know art history,” he says. “Shock value only lasts so long.” His recent works have included series depicting women in burkas, ocean waves, nuclear explosions, views of Sigmund Freud’s apartment, and zoo animals in cages.

Richard Prince
American, b. 1949
Follow

Though the quote “good artists borrow, great artists steal” is traditionally attributed to Pablo Picasso, it could well be Richard Prince’s motto. Prince mines mass-media images to redefine concepts of ownership and authorship, a practice he conceived of while working in the tear-sheets department of Time-Life. In his “Cowboys” series, for example, started in the early 1980s, he re-photographed Marlboro ads, cropping out text to generate close-ups of mythical cowboy figures. His “Nurse” works—first exhibited in 2003—were produced by scanning the covers of pulp paperbacks, transferring them to canvas, and painting over the prints. An avid collector of American subcultures, Prince has also turned his eye to biker chicks, Borscht Belt jokes, and Willem de Kooning canvases. “I don’t see any difference now between what I collect and what I make,” he says. “It’s become the same.”

Cindy Sherman
American, b. 1954
Follow

Cindy Sherman established her reputation—and a novel brand of uncanny self-portraiture—with her “Untitled Film Stills” (1977-80), a series of 69 photographs of the artist herself enacting female clichés of 20th-century pop culture. Though her work continually re-examines women’s roles in history and contemporary society, Sherman resists the notion that her photographs have an explicit narrative or message, leaving them untitled and largely open to interpretation. “I didn’t think of what I was doing as political,” she once said. “To me it was a way to make the best out of what I liked to do privately, which was to dress up.” Always in meticulous costumes, wigs, and makeup, Sherman has produced series in which she dresses as women from history paintings, fashion, and pornography. In the late 1980s and into the ’90s, she expanded her focus to more grotesque imagery, like the mutilated mannequins of her “Sex Pictures” (1992).

Laurie Simmons
American, b. 1949
Follow

Laurie Simmons’ engagement with non-human subjects ranges from her earlier works, in which she photographed miniature scenes of post-war domestic splendor, to her more recent use of life-size sex dolls that appear to be engaged in surprisingly believable activities. Endowing dolls, puppets, and ventriloquist dummies with a very human sense of longing and loneliness, Simmons creates psychologically astute critiques of women’s roles in their myriad incarnations from housewife to sex object. For the series “The Love Doll: Days 1-30” (2009-2011), Simmons transformed her home into a dollhouse and shot a series of photographs documenting the process of becoming acquainted with her custom-made Japanese “love doll”, with the doll appearing to feel increasingly at ease in her surroundings as the days passed.

James Welling
American, b. 1951
Follow

James Welling has consistently pushed the limits of documentary and abstract photography, reinventing the medium in the process. Experimenting with materials such as draperies, pastry dough, and window screens, Welling’s abstract works play with dimension and color to engage the physiological capabilities of the human eye. To create his photograms, Welling dispenses with the camera altogether, using light and color filters to imprint images directly on to the film, as he did for the chromatically brilliant series Flowers (2004-2011).

Michael Zwack
Follow
Sherrie Levine, ‘Metro Pictures, Inaugural Exhibition, Paper Invitation’, 1980, James Fuentes
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Sherrie Levine
American, b. 1947
Follow

Appropriation artist Sherrie Levine, a founding member of The Pictures Generation, is well known for her collections of photographs lifted directly from the work of mostly male modern masters, such as After Walker Evans (1981), After Stieglitz, After Cézanne (2007) and After August Sander (2012). Raising questions about originality and authenticity, Levine re-photographs, abstracts or digitizes these images, making them “ghosts” of the original images. “I want to put a picture on top of a picture,” Levine says. “This makes for times when both disappear and other times when they’re both visible.” Her sculptures and paintings examine similar concerns, as in polished bronze replicas of Marcel Duchamp's urinal or watercolors of famous paintings copied precisely from books, preserving distorted colors or reproductions in black and white.

Troy Brauntuch
American, b. 1954
Follow

A member of the Pictures Generation who showed with contemporaries Jack Goldstein, Robert Longo, and Sherrie Levine in the pivotal 1977 "Pictures" exhibition, Troy Brauntuch is well known for distinctive photo-based works and paintings created with Conté crayon on dark cotton. His subjects range from the ordinary (a cat, a dress, a stack of folded shirts) to the tragic (the 1990 Pan Am bombing), and include many representations of indirect Fascist imagery (as in silk-screened prints based on Hitler's architectural drawings).

Jack Goldstein
Canadian, 1945–2003
Follow

Jack Goldstein was a multimedia artist best known for his involvement with the Pictures Generation, and is considered a pioneer of sound art. One of his central interests was the notion of individualism in a media-saturated society. Over the course of his career, Goldstein worked with sculpture, performance, painting, and written text, but his most famous works were films. He worked with appropriated footage, which he would manipulate to highlight certain rhythms or details. Perhaps his most iconic work was Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (1975), which featured MGM’s mascot roaring on loop. Over time, Goldstein’s techniques increasingly eradicated evidence of the artist’s own hand in the spirit of mass production. He began hiring people to paint his paintings, and others to produce his films and sound.

Thomas Lawson
British, b. 1951
Follow

When Tom Lawson moved to New York in 1975 to paint, he quickly became associated with the Pictures Generation—whose ranks include Cindy Sherman, Barbara Kruger, and Richard Prince—defined by their use of mass media images. Lawson usually culls his subjects from anonymous photographs, images from art history, and even newspaper clippings; from these, he selects sections that he combines in uncanny compositions with jarring colors. While Lawson is often lauded for the ironic humor or political undertones in these works, the artist is wary that “there is this terrible misunderstanding that I don’t like the media, when in fact the whole point is that I can’t get enough of it.”

William Leavitt
American, b. 1941
Follow

William Leavitt is now credited with laying the foundation for West Coast Conceptualism in the late 1960s and early 1970s, but he doesn’t exactly consider himself a conceptual artist. Leavitt prefers to think of himself as “a narrative specialist or something,” trying to “frame some story through an object or a painting or a situation that would lend itself to further narrative.” Leavitt’s diverse practice includes photography, painting, drawings, installation, audio, and performance. He draws from the domestic and industrial landscapes of Los Angeles, and often includes fragments of modernist architecture and references to popular culture. Leavitt is most interested in the relationships between the artificial and the natural, and the intersections of illusion and reality. In his own words, Leavitt entertains an ongoing exploration of “the theater of the ordinary.”

Robert Longo
American, b. 1953
Follow

Robert Longo burst onto the New York art scene as a brash 25-year-old with “Men in the Cities,” his iconic 1983 large-scale charcoal drawings of businessmen posing in uncanny contortions. “I always imagine that I want to make art that is going to kill you,” he said in 1984. “Whether it’s going to do it visually or physically, I’ll take either way.” Longo works and reworks his charcoal into thick-textured surfaces, giving his velvety drawings deep, blackened expanses and sharply contrasting whites; his forms are at once representational and softly elusive. Having been fascinated with popular culture as a child, Longo centers his practice on transposing images and the resulting transformation of meaning, linking him with the Pictures Generation. “An artist should know art history,” he says. “Shock value only lasts so long.” His recent works have included series depicting women in burkas, ocean waves, nuclear explosions, views of Sigmund Freud’s apartment, and zoo animals in cages.

Richard Prince
American, b. 1949
Follow

Though the quote “good artists borrow, great artists steal” is traditionally attributed to Pablo Picasso, it could well be Richard Prince’s motto. Prince mines mass-media images to redefine concepts of ownership and authorship, a practice he conceived of while working in the tear-sheets department of Time-Life. In his “Cowboys” series, for example, started in the early 1980s, he re-photographed Marlboro ads, cropping out text to generate close-ups of mythical cowboy figures. His “Nurse” works—first exhibited in 2003—were produced by scanning the covers of pulp paperbacks, transferring them to canvas, and painting over the prints. An avid collector of American subcultures, Prince has also turned his eye to biker chicks, Borscht Belt jokes, and Willem de Kooning canvases. “I don’t see any difference now between what I collect and what I make,” he says. “It’s become the same.”

Cindy Sherman
American, b. 1954
Follow

Cindy Sherman established her reputation—and a novel brand of uncanny self-portraiture—with her “Untitled Film Stills” (1977-80), a series of 69 photographs of the artist herself enacting female clichés of 20th-century pop culture. Though her work continually re-examines women’s roles in history and contemporary society, Sherman resists the notion that her photographs have an explicit narrative or message, leaving them untitled and largely open to interpretation. “I didn’t think of what I was doing as political,” she once said. “To me it was a way to make the best out of what I liked to do privately, which was to dress up.” Always in meticulous costumes, wigs, and makeup, Sherman has produced series in which she dresses as women from history paintings, fashion, and pornography. In the late 1980s and into the ’90s, she expanded her focus to more grotesque imagery, like the mutilated mannequins of her “Sex Pictures” (1992).

Laurie Simmons
American, b. 1949
Follow

Laurie Simmons’ engagement with non-human subjects ranges from her earlier works, in which she photographed miniature scenes of post-war domestic splendor, to her more recent use of life-size sex dolls that appear to be engaged in surprisingly believable activities. Endowing dolls, puppets, and ventriloquist dummies with a very human sense of longing and loneliness, Simmons creates psychologically astute critiques of women’s roles in their myriad incarnations from housewife to sex object. For the series “The Love Doll: Days 1-30” (2009-2011), Simmons transformed her home into a dollhouse and shot a series of photographs documenting the process of becoming acquainted with her custom-made Japanese “love doll”, with the doll appearing to feel increasingly at ease in her surroundings as the days passed.

James Welling
American, b. 1951
Follow

James Welling has consistently pushed the limits of documentary and abstract photography, reinventing the medium in the process. Experimenting with materials such as draperies, pastry dough, and window screens, Welling’s abstract works play with dimension and color to engage the physiological capabilities of the human eye. To create his photograms, Welling dispenses with the camera altogether, using light and color filters to imprint images directly on to the film, as he did for the chromatically brilliant series Flowers (2004-2011).

Michael Zwack
Follow

Metro Pictures, Inaugural Exhibition, Paper Invitation, 1980

Paper Invitation
7 1/2 × 7 1/2 in
19.1 × 19.1 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
Sold
Location
New York
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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