Portrait of Lt. General Alexander Campbell, M.P., three-quarter-length

Born in Scotland in 1751, Alexander Campbell (1751-1832) gained his lieutenancy in the Royal Regiment in 1770 and was made Captain of the 62nd Regiment in Ireland in September 1772. Campbell embarked for Canada as Captain of light infantry under General Carleton in the Northern Campaign of 1776. After the surrender of the army at Saratoga in late 1777, he exchanged from the Americas and was appointed to serve as Major to the 1st Battalion of light infantry. He was later stationed in the West Indies in 1795, after which he returned to Scotland.

Campbell was a founding member of the Highland Society of Scotland in 1784, and was the Member of Parliament (House of Commons) for Anstruther Easter 1797-1802 and Stirling from June 1807 through July 1818.

Raleigh, The North Carolina Museum of Art, Robert F. Phifer Collection, 31 March-13 May 1973, pp. 68-69.
British Portraits to 1900, The North Carolina Museum of Art Traveling Exhibition.

E. Pinnington, Sir Henry Raeburn, R.A., New York, 1904, pp. 221, 264.

W.R. Valentiner, Catalogue of Paintings: Including Three Sets of Tapestries, Raleigh, 1956, no. 99.

The North Carolina Musuem of Art, British Paintings to 1900: Catalogue of Paintings, Raleigh, 1969, II, no. 98.

PROPERTY OF THE NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART, SOLD TO BENEFIT THE ACQUISITIONS FUND

(Possibly) Lady O'Hagan, London.

Mrs. Helen Cowrie, Glasgow; Christie's, London, 18 May 1951, lot 96 (100 gns. to Bernard).

with Newhouse Galleries, New York, from whom purchased by
The North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, 1952.

About Sir Henry Raeburn

As Scotland’s foremost portrait painter during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Henry Raeburn created works characterized by a unique style and personal technique forged through his own self-instruction. Although early training involved copying the paintings of a portraitist in his native Edinburgh, Raeburn never set foot inside the artist’s studio or an academy. In 1778, Raeburn’s marriage to a wealthy widow granted him the financial security to travel and expand his skills, and he would consequently visit Italy, Rome, and London—the latter where he became acquainted with Sir Joshua Reynolds, the president of the Royal Academy. On his return to Edinburgh, Raeburn was popularly received and would later be knighted by George IV and appointed as the king’s painter. In his best known works, Raeburn placed impressionistic Scottish landscapes as backdrops for his figures, foreshadowing the transition from Romanticism to Impressionism.

Scottish, 1756-1823, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, based in Edinburgh, United Kingdom