Sol LeWitt, ‘BLACK WITH WHITE LINES VERTICAL, NOT TOUCHING (from Conspiracy: The Artist as Witness)’, 1971, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘BLACK WITH WHITE LINES VERTICAL, NOT TOUCHING (from Conspiracy: The Artist as Witness)’, 1971, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘BLACK WITH WHITE LINES VERTICAL, NOT TOUCHING (from Conspiracy: The Artist as Witness)’, 1971, Alpha 137 Gallery

This lithograph pulled by hand by American master Sol LeWitt is a classic example of pure Minimalist art from the early 1970s, the most influential and desirable era. Black With White Lines, Vertical, Not Touching was created for the legendary portfolio Conspiracy: The Artist as Witness, published by the Center for Constitutional Rights to raise money for the legal defense of the Chicago 7, a group of anti-Vietnam War activists indicted for conspiring to riot during the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The portfolio also featured works by Alexander Calder, Jack Beal, Romare Bearden Leon Golub, Nancy Spero, Frank Stella, Robert Morris, Claes Oldenburg, Larry Poons, Bridget Riley, Peter Saul and Raphael Soyer.
Printer: Bank Street Shorewood Atelier (BSA), Publisher: David Godine, Center for Constitutional Rights
Signed and stamped; hand signed and numbered by Sol Lewitt verso (back) bears distinctive blindstamp of the publisher (Shorewood Bank Street Atelier) along with pencil notation verso bears Sol Lewitt's copyright stamp verso in block letters that reads: COPYRIGHT 1971 BY SOL LEWITT
Catalogue Raisonne Reference: 3, Kornfeld

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Signature: Signed and stamped; hand signed and numbered by Sol Lewitt verso (back) bears distinctive blindstamp of the publisher (Shorewood Bank Street Atelier) along with pencil notation verso bears Sol Lewitt's copyright stamp verso in block letters that reads: COPYRIGHT 1971 BY SOL LEWITT

Publisher: Printer: Bank Street Shorewood Atelier (BSA), Publisher: David Godine, Center for Constitutional Rights

Catalogue Raisonne: 3, Kornfeld

Portfolio: Conspiracy: The Artist as Witness, published by David Godine, Center for Constitutional Rights

About Sol LeWitt

One of the leading exponents of Conceptual art, Sol LeWitt stressed the idea behind his work over its execution. “A blind man can make art if what is in his mind can be passed to another mind in some tangible form,” he once said. LeWitt is best known for his large-scale “Wall Drawings,” rigorous arrays of designs, shapes, grids, and colors rendered in pencil and paint in coherence with strict instructions and diagrams to be followed in executing the work. LeWitt made over 1,200 of these works in his career, his visual vocabulary in strong alignment with Minimalism despite his rejection of the movement. His “structures”, as he preferred to call sculptures, were variations on geometric shapes, constructed from steel, polyurethane, or concrete, often featuring stacked cubes without sides. LeWitt is one of the seminal artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, influencing artists like Eva Hesse and Frank Stella, among countless others.

American, 1928-2007, Hartford, Connecticut, based in Chester, Connecticut