Sol LeWitt, ‘Extremely Rare Limited Edition Vintage Signed Louis Vuitton Silk Shawl/Scarf ’, ca. 1987, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘Extremely Rare Limited Edition Vintage Signed Louis Vuitton Silk Shawl/Scarf ’, ca. 1987, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘Extremely Rare Limited Edition Vintage Signed Louis Vuitton Silk Shawl/Scarf ’, ca. 1987, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘Extremely Rare Limited Edition Vintage Signed Louis Vuitton Silk Shawl/Scarf ’, ca. 1987, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘Extremely Rare Limited Edition Vintage Signed Louis Vuitton Silk Shawl/Scarf ’, ca. 1987, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘Extremely Rare Limited Edition Vintage Signed Louis Vuitton Silk Shawl/Scarf ’, ca. 1987, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘Extremely Rare Limited Edition Vintage Signed Louis Vuitton Silk Shawl/Scarf ’, ca. 1987, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘Extremely Rare Limited Edition Vintage Signed Louis Vuitton Silk Shawl/Scarf ’, ca. 1987, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘Extremely Rare Limited Edition Vintage Signed Louis Vuitton Silk Shawl/Scarf ’, ca. 1987, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘Extremely Rare Limited Edition Vintage Signed Louis Vuitton Silk Shawl/Scarf ’, ca. 1987, Alpha 137 Gallery
Sol LeWitt, ‘Extremely Rare Limited Edition Vintage Signed Louis Vuitton Silk Shawl/Scarf ’, ca. 1987, Alpha 137 Gallery

This very rare, desirable limited edition vintage, 100% Italian silk scarf was designed by the internationally renowned artist Sol LeWitt for Louis Vuitton in the late 1980s. It was thought to have been created in an edition of only 500 - but these scarves are so rare it took us 10 years to find this particular Lewitt - so we think the number made could be less. Louis Vuitton’s interest in the arts began in the 1980s when the legendary Paris-based fashion house commissioned important contemporary painters like César, Sol LeWitt, James Rosenquist, Sandro Chia and Olivier Debré to create exclusive scarf designs. Demonstrating the influence of art on artisanship, these collaborations became a tradition and reached a new level when Marc Jacobs joined the fashion house in 1997. Later on, Louis Vuitton would famously collaborate with art superstars like Takashi Murakami, Richard Prince and Yayoi Kusama; but early works, like this Sol Lewitt, were done in far more limited editions.
Literature: Louis Vuitton: Art, Fashion and Architecture (Rizzoli, 2009)

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Signature: Signed on the fabric with artist's printed signature lower right and printed Louis Vuitton brand name and Louis Vuitton 100% silk fabric.

Louis Vuitton: Art, Fashion and Architecture (Rizzoli, 2009)

Louis Vuitton

About Sol LeWitt

One of the leading exponents of Conceptual art, Sol LeWitt stressed the idea behind his work over its execution. “A blind man can make art if what is in his mind can be passed to another mind in some tangible form,” he once said. LeWitt is best known for his large-scale “Wall Drawings,” rigorous arrays of designs, shapes, grids, and colors rendered in pencil and paint in coherence with strict instructions and diagrams to be followed in executing the work. LeWitt made over 1,200 of these works in his career, his visual vocabulary in strong alignment with Minimalism despite his rejection of the movement. His “structures”, as he preferred to call sculptures, were variations on geometric shapes, constructed from steel, polyurethane, or concrete, often featuring stacked cubes without sides. LeWitt is one of the seminal artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, influencing artists like Eva Hesse and Frank Stella, among countless others.

American, 1928-2007, Hartford, Connecticut, based in Chester, Connecticut