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D
Doyle

with text by Jacques Damase, signed by both the artist and the author and numbered XII and dedicated to Dorothy Lewis in ink on the justification, bound as issued, in original linen-covered portfolio box.

Sheets: 11.125 x 7.625 inches; 283 x 194 mm.

Condition: The pochoirs and text in good condition, the covers with …

Medium

Sonia Delaunay’s innovative explorations of color and form were integral to the development of abstract art in the early 20th century. Initially inspired by quilt patterns, Delaunay eventually incorporated the stylistic concerns of Cubism, Fauvism, and Futurism into her bright, geometric paintings and prints. She variously dubbed her style “Orphism” or “Simultaneism” and focused on the possibilities of color combinations. In 1964, Delaunay became the first living female artist to have a retrospective exhibition at the Louvre; her work would later be shown at institutions including the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris, the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, the Centre Pompidou, Tate Modern, and Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Delaunay also worked in fashion, interior design, graphics, collage, bookmaking, and textiles—and blurred the boundaries between these disciplines and fine art.

High auction record
€4.1m, Calmels Cohen, 2002
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Tate
Selected exhibitions
2021
Sonia Delaunay: Rhythm and ColourBASTIAN
small is beautiful !Galerie Denise René
2015
The EY Exhibition: Sonia DelaunayTate
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27 Tableaux Vivants, 1969

Complete set of 27 color pochoirs
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D
Doyle

with text by Jacques Damase, signed by both the artist and the author and numbered XII and …

Medium

Sonia Delaunay’s innovative explorations of color and form were integral to the development of abstract art in the early 20th century. Initially inspired by quilt patterns, Delaunay eventually incorporated the stylistic concerns of Cubism, Fauvism, and Futurism into her bright, geometric paintings and prints. She variously dubbed her style “Orphism” or “Simultaneism” and focused on the possibilities of color combinations. In 1964, Delaunay became the first living female artist to have a retrospective exhibition at the Louvre; her work would later be shown at institutions including the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris, the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, the Centre Pompidou, Tate Modern, and Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Delaunay also worked in fashion, interior design, graphics, collage, bookmaking, and textiles—and blurred the boundaries between these disciplines and fine art.

High auction record
€4.1m, Calmels Cohen, 2002
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Tate
Selected exhibitions (3)
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