D
Doyle

signed, dated and numbered 41/75 in pencil.

23.875 x 17.625 inches; 606 x 448 mm.
Sheet: 30 x 22 inches; 762 x 559 mm.

Condition: Some unobtrusive handling creases, minor printer's ink or soiling in the margins and verso, an almost imperceptible area of light abrasion at bottom sheet corner verso (only visible …

Medium

Sonia Delaunay’s innovative explorations of color and form were integral to the development of abstract art in the early 20th century. Initially inspired by quilt patterns, Delaunay eventually incorporated the stylistic concerns of Cubism, Fauvism, and Futurism into her bright, geometric paintings and prints. She variously dubbed her style “Orphism” or “Simultaneism” and focused on the possibilities of color combinations. In 1964, Delaunay became the first living female artist to have a retrospective exhibition at the Louvre; her work would later be shown at institutions including the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris, the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, the Centre Pompidou, Tate Modern, and Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Delaunay also worked in fashion, interior design, graphics, collage, bookmaking, and textiles—and blurred the boundaries between these disciplines and fine art.

High auction record
€4.1m, Calmels Cohen, 2002
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Tate
Selected exhibitions
2021
Sonia Delaunay: Rhythm and ColourBASTIAN
small is beautiful !Galerie Denise René
2015
The EY Exhibition: Sonia DelaunayTate
View all

Cathédrale, 1971

Color lithograph, on wove paper
23 7/8 × 17 5/8 in
60.6 × 44.8 cm
Edition 41/75
.
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
D
Doyle

signed, dated and numbered 41/75 in pencil.

23.875 x 17.625 inches; 606 x 448 mm.
Sheet: 30 x 22 …

Medium

Sonia Delaunay’s innovative explorations of color and form were integral to the development of abstract art in the early 20th century. Initially inspired by quilt patterns, Delaunay eventually incorporated the stylistic concerns of Cubism, Fauvism, and Futurism into her bright, geometric paintings and prints. She variously dubbed her style “Orphism” or “Simultaneism” and focused on the possibilities of color combinations. In 1964, Delaunay became the first living female artist to have a retrospective exhibition at the Louvre; her work would later be shown at institutions including the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris, the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, the Centre Pompidou, Tate Modern, and Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Delaunay also worked in fashion, interior design, graphics, collage, bookmaking, and textiles—and blurred the boundaries between these disciplines and fine art.

High auction record
€4.1m, Calmels Cohen, 2002
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Tate
Selected exhibitions (3)

Series by this artist

Other works by Sonia Delaunay
Related works