Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.
Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.
Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.
Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.
Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.
Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.
Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.
Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.
Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.
Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.
Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.
Sophie Calle, ‘The Address Book’, 2009, Gemini G.E.L.

Elaborating on a 1984 project for the French daily newspaper, Libération, Calle assembled a collection of prints as artifacts documenting her account of finding a stranger’s address book, and her subsequent effort to understand its owner through interviews with his friends and acquaintances who she found listed inside. Beyond the recorded testimonials from her informants, the 28 pages are filled with narratives that are colored by Calle’s own range of emotions, from anxiety to satisfaction about probing into this persons life. The work culminates with a beautifully etched, textual portrait summarizing her impression of this man called Pierre D.

The portfolio of prints includes a triptych (one etching with gold leaf, one blind embossment and one 5-color lithograph with book cloth) along with 28 pages, each with text and photographs, that is presented in a binder. As you can see from the installation images below, a few or all of the pages can be framed and displayed in a number of ways. It’s a poetic collection, documenting a process of discovery that drifts between anonymity and transparency.

Publisher: Gemini G.E.L.

About Sophie Calle

A controversial figure as well as one of France’s leading conceptual artists, Sophie Calle explores her own psychological and emotional terrain in multimedia works, probing ideas of control, freedom, gender, intimacy, and distance in human relationships. Perhaps her most contentious work, Address Book (1983) was inspired by an address book that Calle found on the street, photographed, and sent back to its owner. She then rang the numbers in the book to assemble a portrait of the owner, turning the results into a multimedia installation. For Take Care of Yourself (2007), which was exhibited in the French pavilion at the 2007 Venice Biennale, Calle invited 107 women from various walks of life to interpret and assess a breakup note the artist received in an email. In a range of media including photographic portraits, textual analysis, and filmed performances, women pore over the emotional content of the email; contributions include a clairvoyant’s response, a scientific study, and a child’s fairytale.

French, b. 1953, Paris, France, based in Malakoff, France

Group Shows

2018
BAM
Brooklyn,
2017
New York,
Perrotin Bookstore NYC
2017
2015
ARNDT, 
Singapore,
2013
GASK - Gallery of the Central Bohemian Region, 
Kutna Hora, Czechia,
Images For Images (Artists fir Tichy)
View Artist's CV