Stephen Andrews, ‘Crowd, 2004’, 2004, Waddington's
Stephen Andrews, ‘Crowd, 2004’, 2004, Waddington's
Stephen Andrews, ‘Crowd, 2004’, 2004, Waddington's
Stephen Andrews, ‘Crowd, 2004’, 2004, Waddington's
Stephen Andrews, ‘Crowd, 2004’, 2004, Waddington's
Stephen Andrews, ‘Crowd, 2004’, 2004, Waddington's
Stephen Andrews, ‘Crowd, 2004’, 2004, Waddington's
Stephen Andrews, ‘Crowd, 2004’, 2004, Waddington's
Stephen Andrews, ‘Crowd, 2004’, 2004, Waddington's
Stephen Andrews, ‘Crowd, 2004’, 2004, Waddington's

Stephen Andrews’ work is driven by a sense of apartness—a quiet alienation—and the framing devices of a subject peering from the outside in, or the inside out. Crowd epitomizes this body of work, as a sectioned canvas split into window-like panes looks over a crowd of people, their faces nearly indistinguishable from one another, pixelated as if being remembered, not pictured. Color gives way to patterning, a mass of people like a constellation. Andrews is represented by Paul Petro Contemporary Art, Toronto, and his work has been collected by the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; the Belkin Art Gallery, Vancouver; and the Schwartz Collection at Harvard among others. —Courtesy of Waddington’s

This auction will be conducted in US dollars, and the final hammer prices will be collected in Canadian dollars. After the auction, the hammer prices will be converted using the midpoint rate at market closing on the last day of the bidding period using the OANDA Historical Exchange calculator.

Signature: Signed on panel #9

Private Collection, Toronto

About Stephen Andrews

Stephen Andrews reliably paints his subjects—and positions his viewers—at a remove. Beginning his artistic trajectory with a serially-produced collection of greyscale portraits featuring subjects diagnosed with AIDS, Andrews (himself diagnosed with HIV thirty years ago) shifted into color following the attacks of September 11, 2001. It was a calamity he observed at a close distance in New York City, and channeled, in a state of shock, through a series of dot paintings that reveal subjects and palettes additively, and at a distance. Andrews’ absorption in the production of color and the repetitiveness of painting has provided him a distraction from grief while promoting a distancing and reflective aesthetic.

Canadian , b. 1956