Stuart Haygarth, ‘Barnacle’, 2009, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design
Stuart Haygarth, ‘Barnacle’, 2009, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design
Stuart Haygarth, ‘Barnacle’, 2009, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design
Stuart Haygarth, ‘Barnacle’, 2009, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design

The artist about his work: After viewing a photographic book on deep sea ship wrecks I became interested in how specific inhabitants of our oceans, such as barnacles and algae, envelop and transform the underwater landscape. The shape and form of decaying ships metamorphose on the sea bed embellished over years with thousands of shellfish attached to their structure.

Taking the place of natural barnacles I used black plastic objects collected from Dungeness Beach in Kent. Carefully mimicking nature, these manufactured elements were carefully attached to a basic sideboard form to exaggerate and disfigure its original appearance. All the exterior surfaces of the sideboard are inhabited by objects, filling every available space.

The groupings of plastic objects have been cast in black polyester resin to create a more uniform colour. Although a sculptural object the sideboard is totally functional with a concealed door on each side containing adjustable shelving and two central drawers.

About Stuart Haygarth

Creating order and symmetry out of randomness and waste, Stuart Haygarth’s evocative, jewel-like light designs are as much about the process of collecting and collating discarded materials as they are about the elevation of these materials to objects of value or beauty. Inspired by American sculptor Tom Friedman’s meticulous assemblages of common or unusual objects, Haygarth makes vitrines and chandeliers from a wide array of materials, ranging from eyeglasses to items that wash up on the English coastline, constructing narratives about time, waste, loss, abandonment, and modernity. Haygarth is also attuned to how light itself is dispersed by his chosen materials, as seen in the Millenium Chandelier (2005), where he arranged 1,000 exploded firecrackers from New Year’s celebrations into a colorful, diamond-shaped chandelier.

British, b. 1966, Whalley, Lancashire, United Kingdom

Fair History on Artsy

2013
Gallery Libby Sellers at Design Miami/ Basel 2013