Tadanori Yokoo, ‘Devine Symbol’, 1990, Print, Screenprint, Yodo Gallery
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Tadanori Yokoo

Devine Symbol, 1990

Screenprint
65 × 43 3/10 in
165 × 110 cm
Edition 80/100
.
Contact For Price
Location
Osaka
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Medium
Tadanori Yokoo
Japanese, b. 1936
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Tadanori Yokoo (b. 1936 - ) is a Japanese graphic designer, illustrator, printmaker and painter. Yokoo is one of Japan's most successful and internationally recognized graphic designers and artists. He began his career as a stage designer for avant garde theatre in Tokyo. His early work shows the influence of the New York based Push Pin Studio (Milton Glaser and Seymour Chwast in particular) but Yokoo himself cites filmmaker Akira Kurosawa and writer Yukio Mishima as two of his most formative influences. In the late 1960s he became interested in mysticism and psychedelia, deepened by travels in India. Because his work was so attuned to 1960s pop culture, he has often been (unfairly) described as the "Japanese Andy Warhol" or likened to psychedelic poster artist Peter Max, but Yokoo's complex and multi-layered imagery is intensely autobiographical and entirely original. By the late 60s he had already achieved international recognition for his work and was included in the 1968 "Word & Image" exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

In 1968 Yukio Mishima claimed, "Tadanori Yokoo's works reveal all of the unbearable things which we Japanese have inside ourselves and they make people angry and frightened. He makes explosions with the frightening resemblance which lies between the vulgarity of billboards advertising variety shows during festivals at the shrine devoted to the war dead and the red containers of Coca Cola in American Pop Art, things which are in us but which we do not want to see."

Tadanori Yokoo, ‘Devine Symbol’, 1990, Print, Screenprint, Yodo Gallery
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
Medium
Tadanori Yokoo
Japanese, b. 1936
Follow

Tadanori Yokoo (b. 1936 - ) is a Japanese graphic designer, illustrator, printmaker and painter. Yokoo is one of Japan's most successful and internationally recognized graphic designers and artists. He began his career as a stage designer for avant garde theatre in Tokyo. His early work shows the influence of the New York based Push Pin Studio (Milton Glaser and Seymour Chwast in particular) but Yokoo himself cites filmmaker Akira Kurosawa and writer Yukio Mishima as two of his most formative influences. In the late 1960s he became interested in mysticism and psychedelia, deepened by travels in India. Because his work was so attuned to 1960s pop culture, he has often been (unfairly) described as the "Japanese Andy Warhol" or likened to psychedelic poster artist Peter Max, but Yokoo's complex and multi-layered imagery is intensely autobiographical and entirely original. By the late 60s he had already achieved international recognition for his work and was included in the 1968 "Word & Image" exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

In 1968 Yukio Mishima claimed, "Tadanori Yokoo's works reveal all of the unbearable things which we Japanese have inside ourselves and they make people angry and frightened. He makes explosions with the frightening resemblance which lies between the vulgarity of billboards advertising variety shows during festivals at the shrine devoted to the war dead and the red containers of Coca Cola in American Pop Art, things which are in us but which we do not want to see."

Tadanori Yokoo

Devine Symbol, 1990

Screenprint
65 × 43 3/10 in
165 × 110 cm
Edition 80/100
.
Contact For Price
Location
Osaka
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Other works by Tadanori Yokoo
Other works from Yodo Gallery
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