Takashi Murakami, ‘727999’, 2016, Cerbera Gallery
Takashi Murakami, ‘727999’, 2016, Cerbera Gallery

Takashi Murakami
Title: 727999
Medium: Offset lithograph
Size: 38 x 25"
Year: 2016
Edition: 300
Signed, numbered, and dated

Takashi Murakami (born February 1, 1962) is a Japanese contemporary artist who works in fine arts media (such as painting and sculpture) as well as commercial media (such as fashion, merchandise, and animation). Murakami studied at the Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan where he received his B.F.A. in 1986, his M.F.A. in 1988, and his P.h.D. in 1993. He founded the Hiropon factory in Tokyo in 1996, which later evolved into Kaikai Kiki, an art production and art management corporation.

One of the biggest names in the contemporary art world, Takashi Murakami's work is immediately recognizable for its popping, candy-like colors and anime-esque aesthetic. Often featuring playful imagery like smiling flowers, oversized, blinking eyes, and Technicolor mushrooms, Murakami is truly the heir to Warhol in his ability to appropriate commercial, popular images inspired by anime and manga (Japanese comics) into high-quality pieces of fine art. Because of his commercial appeal, his works have been translated onto various other media ranging from keychains and mugs to a collaboration with French couture powerhouse Louis Vuitton, which began in 2002. In 2010, a selection of Murakami's sculptures were featured against the opulent, iconic Western background of Château de Versailles. In addition, His work has been the subject of numerous exhibitions around the world, including those held at the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo, Gagosian Gallery in London, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, Museum für Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt.

Signature: Signed, numbered, and dated

Image rights: Cerbera Gallery, Inc.

About Takashi Murakami

One of the most acclaimed artists to emerge from postwar Asia, Takashi Murakami—“the Warhol of Japan”—is known for his contemporary Pop synthesis of fine art and popular culture, particularly his use of a boldly graphic and colorful anime and manga cartoon style. Murakami became famous in the 1990s for his “Superflat” theory and for organizing the paradigmatic exhibition of that title, which linked the origins of contemporary Japanese visual culture to historical Japanese art. His output includes paintings, sculptures, drawings, animations, and collaborations with brands such as Louis Vuitton. “Japanese people accept that art and commerce will be blended; and in fact, they are surprised by the rigid and pretentious Western hierarchy of “high art’,” Murakami says. “In the West, it certainly is dangerous to blend the two because people will throw all sorts of stones. But that’s okay—I’m ready with my hard hat.”

Japanese, b. 1962, Tokyo, Japan, based in Tokyo, Japan