Taxile Doat, ‘Vase de Théâtre Romain’, 1906, Jason Jacques Gallery
Taxile Doat, ‘Vase de Théâtre Romain’, 1906, Jason Jacques Gallery
Taxile Doat, ‘Vase de Théâtre Romain’, 1906, Jason Jacques Gallery
Taxile Doat, ‘Vase de Théâtre Romain’, 1906, Jason Jacques Gallery
Taxile Doat, ‘Vase de Théâtre Romain’, 1906, Jason Jacques Gallery
Taxile Doat, ‘Vase de Théâtre Romain’, 1906, Jason Jacques Gallery
Taxile Doat, ‘Vase de Théâtre Romain’, 1906, Jason Jacques Gallery
Taxile Doat, ‘Vase de Théâtre Romain’, 1906, Jason Jacques Gallery
Taxile Doat, ‘Vase de Théâtre Romain’, 1906, Jason Jacques Gallery
Taxile Doat, ‘Vase de Théâtre Romain’, 1906, Jason Jacques Gallery

Usually inspired by Japanese and Far Eastern designs, Taxile Doat’s porcelain vase with Roman motifs testifies to the diversity and originality of his maker’s work with porcelain. The vase was made in Doat’s private studio at Sevres, a year after he was dismissed from the National Manufactory where he lacked the freedom to experiment with the medium.
The iconography of this vase clearly refers to ancient Roman theater, as seen through the depiction of expressive masks and olive tree leaves. These figurative elements, later added to the vase, give a sense of three-dimensionality to the vessel and contrast with the brown monochrome background. The details of the masks are particularly meticulous and remarkable.

Signature: Marked "TDOAT Sèvres" 1906

About Taxile Doat

Taxile Doat began working at the Sèvres National Manufactory in 1877. Throughout his tenure there, he maintained a private atelier, at first in Paris and later both in Paris and in the city of Sèvres. Doat's studio ceramics nearly rejected the classical vocabulary that dominated the remarkable pâte-sur-pâte work he created at Sèvres. Instead he favored the Japanese aesthetic of organic shapes and running glazes. His macro crystalline glazes were especially well received. [Source: Jason Jacques]

French, 1851-1939