Tom Otterness, ‘UNTITLED SILKSCREEN WITH PENCIL DRAWING from "Way in Way Out" Portfolio’, 1996-1997, Alpha 137 Gallery
Tom Otterness, ‘UNTITLED SILKSCREEN WITH PENCIL DRAWING from "Way in Way Out" Portfolio’, 1996-1997, Alpha 137 Gallery
Tom Otterness, ‘UNTITLED SILKSCREEN WITH PENCIL DRAWING from "Way in Way Out" Portfolio’, 1996-1997, Alpha 137 Gallery
Tom Otterness, ‘UNTITLED SILKSCREEN WITH PENCIL DRAWING from "Way in Way Out" Portfolio’, 1996-1997, Alpha 137 Gallery

Terrific limited edition signed Tom Otterness silkscreen depicting a man with a dollar sign for a head and the letters EAT at his nape -- in the artist's inimitable style. The artist signed in a red graphite pencil, and also did some hand drawing on the print - to emphasize the dollar sign! A terrific, quintessential Otterness piece. This work is elegantly matted in a blond wood frame. Ready to hang! This was part of the "Way in Way Out" Portfolio, published by Exit Art to raise funds for their non profit activities. Other artists who contributed to this portfolio are Judy Pfaff, Ida Applebroog and Jane Hammond. This is a scarce Otterness print - as the edition was only 50, and so many works from this portfolio are already in public and private institutional collections.

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Signature: Signed in red graphite, lower left; numbered from the edition of 50 lower right.

Publisher: Exit Art

"Way in, Way Out" Portfolio, 1996-7, Exit Art

About Tom Otterness

Since the 1970s, Tom Otterness has been populating public spaces with his impish human and animal sculptures, through which he gently lampoons American society. Disarmingly cute and cartoonish, and underpinned by art history, popular culture, and a democratic vision, his characters mock societal groups. “The artwork itself has five character types: blue collar workers, white collar workers, cops, […] radicals, […] and […] rich people,” he says. “And I take those five classes and […] make scenarios out of them.” Otterness uses the “lost wax” process to cast his bronze figures, which range from monumental to palm-sized. He explores class, money, race, and sex in his works, putting these fraught topics into the public sphere to spark conversation.

American, b. 1952, Wichita, Kansas, based in New York, New York

Solo Shows

2017
Marlborough Gallery, New York,

Fair History on Artsy

2014
Marlborough Gallery at The Armory Show 2014
2014
Marlborough Gallery at ARCO Madrid 2014
2013
Marlborough Gallery at Contemporary Istanbul 2013