Tony Cragg, ‘Laboratory Still Life II, State 1’, 1988, Print, Etching and aquatint, Capsule Gallery Auction
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Tony Cragg

Laboratory Still Life II, State 1, 1988

Etching and aquatint
11 1/4 × 35 1/4 in
28.6 × 89.5 cm
Edition 7/30
Bidding closed
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About the work
Provenance
CGA
Capsule Gallery Auction
New York

British (b.1949)

frame: 23 1/2 X 46 1/4 inches

High-resolution photographs and condition reports …

Medium
Signature
Signed lower right
Tony Cragg
British, b. 1949
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Turner Prize-winning sculptor Tony Cragg emerged in the late 1970s with a bold practice that questioned and tested the limits of a wide variety of traditional sculptural materials, including bronze, steel, glass, wood, and stone. “I’m an absolute materialist, and for me material is exciting and ultimately sublime,” he has said. Eschewing factory fabrication of his works, Cragg has been known to merge contemporary industrial materials with the suggestion of the functional forms of mundane objects and ancient vessels—like jars, bottles, and test tubes—resulting in sublime, sinuous, and twisting forms. One of his best-known works is Terris Novalis (1997), an enormous, enigmatic public steel sculpture of engineering instruments. “When I’m involved in making sculpture, I’m looking for a system of belief or ethics in the material,” he says. “I want that material to have a dynamic, to push and move and grow.

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Tony Cragg, ‘Laboratory Still Life II, State 1’, 1988, Print, Etching and aquatint, Capsule Gallery Auction
Navigate right
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Provenance
CGA
Capsule Gallery Auction
New York

British (b.1949)

frame: 23 1/2 X 46 1/4 inches

High-resolution photographs and condition reports are available by contacting the gallery.

Medium
Signature
Signed lower right
Tony Cragg
British, b. 1949
Follow

Turner Prize-winning sculptor Tony Cragg emerged in the late 1970s with a bold practice that questioned and tested the limits of a wide variety of traditional sculptural materials, including bronze, steel, glass, wood, and stone. “I’m an absolute materialist, and for me material is exciting and ultimately sublime,” he has said. Eschewing factory fabrication of his works, Cragg has been known to merge contemporary industrial materials with the suggestion of the functional forms of mundane objects and ancient vessels—like jars, bottles, and test tubes—resulting in sublime, sinuous, and twisting forms. One of his best-known works is Terris Novalis (1997), an enormous, enigmatic public steel sculpture of engineering instruments. “When I’m involved in making sculpture, I’m looking for a system of belief or ethics in the material,” he says. “I want that material to have a dynamic, to push and move and grow.

Tony Cragg

Laboratory Still Life II, State 1, 1988

Etching and aquatint
11 1/4 × 35 1/4 in
28.6 × 89.5 cm
Edition 7/30
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
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