Friends Seminary Benefit Auction

Framed. With Frame: 32.5 x 24.5 in.

Preliminary online bidding closes on March 9th at 4:00PM EST. Online bids will be transferred and executed at the benefit event later that night.

Medium
Image rights
Courtesy of the Artist and Lehmann Maupin

A pioneer of new-media art since the mid-1970s, Tony Oursler is best known for his video projections and installation works that explore technology's effects on the human mind. Honing in on much of humanity's compulsive relationship with computers and virtual networks, Oursler orchestrates microcosmic scenes, tableaus, and interventions that convey the obsession, escapism, isolation, and sexual fetish that cause or grow out of technological dependence. His works include talking streetlights, an eight-foot-long five-dollar bill with an eerily animated Abe Lincoln, an enormous cell phone spewing disjointed snippets of conversations, and ghoulish heads muttering phrases like “You treat me like garbage. I told you I love you but I don’t. Thanks for nothing.” Oursler invites viewers into disorienting psychological mini-dramas, at once engaging in their humor and disturbing for their uncanny juxtapositions and keen, biting commentaries.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions
2017
Sound Digressions: SpectrumGalerie Mitterrand
2016
TONY OURSLER »𝗉𝖴#\*𝖼«Galerie Hans Mayer
2014
Tony Oursler: ObscuraGalerie Hans Mayer
View all

Friends, Friends, Friends, 2002

Acrylic on paper
30 × 22 in
76.2 × 55.9 cm
Bidding closed
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Friends Seminary Benefit Auction

Framed. With Frame: 32.5 x 24.5 in.

Preliminary online bidding closes on March 9th at 4:00PM EST. …

Medium
Image rights
Courtesy of the Artist and Lehmann Maupin

A pioneer of new-media art since the mid-1970s, Tony Oursler is best known for his video projections and installation works that explore technology's effects on the human mind. Honing in on much of humanity's compulsive relationship with computers and virtual networks, Oursler orchestrates microcosmic scenes, tableaus, and interventions that convey the obsession, escapism, isolation, and sexual fetish that cause or grow out of technological dependence. His works include talking streetlights, an eight-foot-long five-dollar bill with an eerily animated Abe Lincoln, an enormous cell phone spewing disjointed snippets of conversations, and ghoulish heads muttering phrases like “You treat me like garbage. I told you I love you but I don’t. Thanks for nothing.” Oursler invites viewers into disorienting psychological mini-dramas, at once engaging in their humor and disturbing for their uncanny juxtapositions and keen, biting commentaries.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works by Tony Oursler
Related works
Related artists