Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, ‘One Hundred Aspects of the Moon: The Cry of the Fox’, 1886, Scholten Japanese Art

signed Yoshitoshi with artist's seal Yoshitoshi, carved by Enkatsu, and publisher's date and address seal Meiji jukyunen, ichigatsu, -ka; Nihonbashi-ku Muromachi Sanchome 9-banchi, insatsu ken hakkosha Akiyama Buemon (Meiji 19 [1886], January) of Akiyama Buemon of Kokkeido

oban tate-e 14 3/8 by 9 1/2 in., 36.4 by 24 cm

The story of a shape-shifting fox is the subject of the kyogen drama The Cry of the Fox (Konkai). Kyogen were short, humorous interludes staged between the acts of a Noh play. In Konkai, a hunter is visited by his uncle, the priest Hakuzosu, who lectures his nephew on the evils of killing foxes. The hunter is convinced and the priest departs. However, at that moment the hunter hears a fox's cry and realizes that his uncle had been a fox in disguise all along. According to Japanese folklore foxes had the power of transformation, a power often used to serve their crafty ends.

Publisher: Akiyama Buemon of Kokkeido

Published:
Highlights of Japanese Printmaking: Part Five - Yoshitoshi, Scholten Japanese Art, New York, 2017, cat. no. 79

References:
Roger Keyes, Courage and Silence, 1983, p. 461, no. 478.13
Eric van den Ing & Robert Schaap, Beauty and Violence, 1992, p. 133, no. 54.13
John Stevenson, Yoshitoshi's 100 Aspects of the Moon, 2001, no. 13
Ota Memorial Museum of Art, Yoshitoshi: 32 Aspects of Women and 100 Aspects of the Moon, 2009, p. 22, no. 2.13
Amy Reigle Newland & Chris Uhlenbeck, Yoshitoshi: Masterpieces from the Ed Fries Collection, 2011, p. 137, 102
Yuriko Iwakiri, Yoshitoshi, 2014, p. 154, no. 232

About Tsukioka Yoshitoshi