Unknown Roman, ‘Roman Glass Aryballos - Beautiful Iridescence’, 100-300, Muzeion Gallery
Unknown Roman, ‘Roman Glass Aryballos - Beautiful Iridescence’, 100-300, Muzeion Gallery
Unknown Roman, ‘Roman Glass Aryballos - Beautiful Iridescence’, 100-300, Muzeion Gallery
Unknown Roman, ‘Roman Glass Aryballos - Beautiful Iridescence’, 100-300, Muzeion Gallery

Roman Glass Aryballos with Lattice Work Thread in Glass. This example was blown from glass of translucent blue-green, the body is globular with a small flat bottom and short narrow neck; the lip flat with a rounded edge.

The Aryballos was an ancient container used for storing oil. Vessels such as this were worn by Ancient Roman athletes and used in cleansing of the skin, as described by Herrmann and Kondoleon:

After exercising, the athletes stripped off the oily, dirty, sweaty, and often bloody mess using a metal scraper – called a stlengis in Greek, but better known by its Latin name, strigil. The oils were kept in long alabastra or small round aryballoi, which have been found in glass, bronze and ceramic versions. Athletes typically carried these from a strap wrapped around their wrists.

References: J.Herrmann, C.Kondoleon, Games for the Gods: The Greek Athlete and the Olympic Spirit, 2004, MFA, p.132.

Beautiful Iridescence.

Italy

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