Unknown Artist, ‘Bifacial Hand Axe’, 600, Chamber

The bifacial hand axe of the Homo Heidelbergensis is a multi-purpose tool that was used for hunting, chopping, and perhaps also for fighting. The first hand axes were discovered in 1797 by Englishman John Frere in the village of Hoxne, in Suffolk; he wrote that the flints were “weapons of war, fabricated by a people who had not the use of metals.”
Although his discovery, reported to the Society of Antiquares in Britain, was discredited at first, it would later lead to the establishment of the field of Paleolithic Archaeology as it’s known today, and confirmed the species’ sophisticated thought and skill.

Ancient Libya

About Unknown Artist

Solo Shows on Artsy

2016
Sites Eternels, RMN Grand Palais, Paris
2016
THE SHOP at FraenkelLAB, Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
2016
Epic Tales from India: Paintings from the San Diego Museum of Art, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton
2016
The Future of the Past: Mummies and Medicine, Legion of Honor, San Francisco
2015
Blue: Alchemy of a Colour, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
2015
Royal Hawaiian Featherwork: Nā Hulu Ali‘i, de Young Museum, San Francisco
2015
New for Now, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam
View Artist's CV