Unknown, ‘Rare 19th Century Ketubah Hand Written Text Gothic German Gold Leaf NYC 1870’, Late 19th Century, Lions Gallery
Unknown, ‘Rare 19th Century Ketubah Hand Written Text Gothic German Gold Leaf NYC 1870’, Late 19th Century, Lions Gallery
Unknown, ‘Rare 19th Century Ketubah Hand Written Text Gothic German Gold Leaf NYC 1870’, Late 19th Century, Lions Gallery
Unknown, ‘Rare 19th Century Ketubah Hand Written Text Gothic German Gold Leaf NYC 1870’, Late 19th Century, Lions Gallery
Unknown, ‘Rare 19th Century Ketubah Hand Written Text Gothic German Gold Leaf NYC 1870’, Late 19th Century, Lions Gallery
Unknown, ‘Rare 19th Century Ketubah Hand Written Text Gothic German Gold Leaf NYC 1870’, Late 19th Century, Lions Gallery

vintage jewish marriage contract, Most likely printed in Germany. Used in New York, hand dated 1870. A rare early American judaic piece.
all written out in a beautiful Hebrew calligraphy.

The Ketubah (pl. ketubot) is the standard marriage contract that Jewish law requires a groom to provide for his bride on their wedding day. It is intended to protect the woman, primarily by establishing the man's financial obligations to her in case of divorce. Although many Jewish communities throughout the centuries have decorated their ketubot, Italian Jews during the 17th and 18th centuries stood out for cultivating the art of ketubah illumination. Italian ketubot commonly featured rich floral ornamentation and images from the Bible as well as from Greek and Roman mythology. They often depicted biblical personalities whose names were identical with those of the bride and groom, or they used images to identify their individual attributes (virtue, charity, etc.). The symbol of the spread out hands of the high priest denoted that the groom was of the priestly family (Kohen). Some have incorporated a coat of arms, an object such as an urn, or a floral or geometric design which often included micrographic designs (the creation of images with minute Hebrew letters).

Condition: Good

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