Unknown, ‘Rare French, Paris 1935 Judaica Oil Painting Rabbis Studying S. Fleischman’, Mid-20th Century, Lions Gallery
Unknown, ‘Rare French, Paris 1935 Judaica Oil Painting Rabbis Studying S. Fleischman’, Mid-20th Century, Lions Gallery
Unknown, ‘Rare French, Paris 1935 Judaica Oil Painting Rabbis Studying S. Fleischman’, Mid-20th Century, Lions Gallery
Unknown, ‘Rare French, Paris 1935 Judaica Oil Painting Rabbis Studying S. Fleischman’, Mid-20th Century, Lions Gallery
Unknown, ‘Rare French, Paris 1935 Judaica Oil Painting Rabbis Studying S. Fleischman’, Mid-20th Century, Lions Gallery

Rare Judaica Art. Jewish genre scene. In the tradition of Moritz Oppenheim, Isidor Kauffman and Maurycy Gottlieb and later of Tully Filmus, Zalman Kleinman and Itshak Holtz the artist captures this Jewish scene with a particular sensitivity. Part of the Ecole De Paris The term "School of Paris" was used in 1925 by André Warnod (fr) to refer to the many foreign-born artists who had migrated to Paris.
School of Paris artists were progressively marginalized. Beginning in 1935 art publications no longer wrote about Marc Chagall, just magazines for Jewish audiences, and by June 1940 when the Vichy government took power, School of Paris artists could no longer exhibit in Paris at all.
The artists working in Paris between World War I and World War II experimented with various styles including Cubism, Orphism, Surrealism and Dada. Foreign and French artists working in Paris included Jean Arp, Joan Miró, Constantin Brâncuși, Raoul Dufy, Tsuguharu Foujita, artists from Belarus like Michel Kikoine, Pinchus Kremegne, and Jacques Lipchitz, the Polish artist Marek Szwarc and others such as Russian-born prince Alexis Arapoff. A significant subset, the Jewish artists, came to be known as the Jewish School of Paris or the School of Montparnasse. The "core members were almost all Jews, and the resentment expressed toward them by French critics in the 1930s was unquestionably fueled by anti-Semitism." One account points to the 1924 Salon des Indépendants, which decided to separate the works of French-born artists from those by immigrants; in response critic Roger Allard (fr) referred to them as the School of Paris. Jewish members of the group included Emmanuel Mané-Katz, Chaim Soutine, Adolphe Féder, Chagall, Moïse Kisling, Maxa Nordau and Shimshon Holzman.
The artists of the Jewish School of Paris were stylistically diverse. Some, like Louis Marcoussis, worked in a cubist style, but most tended toward expression of mood rather than an emphasis on formal structure. Their paintings often feature thickly brushed or troweled impasto. The Musée d'Art et d'Histoire du Judaïsme has works from School of Paris artists including Jules Pascin, Michel Kikoine, Soutine, Chana Orloff and Jacques Lipchitz.

Condition: Good

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