Utagawa Hiroshige (Andō Hiroshige), ‘Fukuroi, from the series 53 Stations of the Tokaido’, 1855, Japan Society Benefit Auction 2017
Utagawa Hiroshige (Andō Hiroshige), ‘Fukuroi, from the series 53 Stations of the Tokaido’, 1855, Japan Society Benefit Auction 2017

Courtesy of Ronin Gallery l NYC

Widely acclaimed as the last great master of the traditional ukiyo-e woodblock print, Utagawa Hiroshige was the creator of numerous iconic works, and, along with Kunisada and Kuniyoshi, was among the best known of the artists of the late Edo-period Utagawa school. A master of landscape subjects, Hiroshige’s work departs from the typical themes that were most popular in woodblock prints of his time, namely kabuki actors, beauties, and scenes from Yoshiwara, the pleasure district of Edo (modern-day Tokyo). His work was studied intensively by Western artists of the late nineteenth century, for them becoming almost synonymous with traditional Japanese art: Vincent van Gogh in fact produced two paintings after Hiroshige prints. Along with his One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (first serialized 1856-59), Hiroshige’s Fifty-Three Stations of the Tōkaidō—to which the current lot belongs—is one of his most celebrated series.
Courtesy of Japan Society

Signature: with seal

About Utagawa Hiroshige (Andō Hiroshige)