navigate left
navigate right
Save
Save
share
Share
Save
Save
share
Share

Untitled

This is part of a limited edition set.
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
About the work
Provenance
A
ArtRite

Ten silkscreens by Adami V., Baj E., Ceretti M., Colombo G., Del Pezzo L., Pardi G., Rotella M., …

Read more

Ten silkscreens by Adami V., Baj E., Ceretti M., Colombo G., Del Pezzo L., Pardi G., Rotella M., Spoldi A., Tadini E., Varisco G., ed. 36/100

Dimensions of each silkscreen: 50 x 35 cm

Medium
Print
Signature
Each silkscreen is signed and numbered in pencil by the artist
Valerio Adami
Italian, b. 1935
Follow

Valerio Adami is internationally recognized for his seductively rich, psychologically complex paintings, through which he wryly examines Western civilization and modern society. He draws heavily upon the visual idioms of Pop Art, with its cartoonish imagery, flatness, and eye-popping colors. Though they lack visual depth, Adami’s works are layered with meanings; he uses potent imagery to symbolize specific themes, painting a lake to represent the subconscious or a woman in a boat to refer to the passage of life.

Gianni Colombo
Italian, 1937–1993
Follow

Gianni Colombo—a key figure in the rise of Kinetic art in the 1950s and ’60s—worked in diverse media, including painting, sculpture, furniture design, and light installation. A founder of the art movement Gruppo T, Colombo believed art must be kinetic and participatory. His aim was to create interactive spaces that abolished the static boundaries dividing painting, sculpture, and architecture. In 1968, Colombo won first prize at the Venice Biennale with his 1967 work Spazio Elastico (Elastic Space), an interactive piece in which viewers enter a darkened room and are confronted by a shifting cube of luminescent elastic strings. This would ultimately became his most famous work (it was re-mounted at the 2011 Venice Biennale).

Mimmo Rotella
Italian, 1918–2006
Follow

Mimmo Rotella, who represented Italy in the 1964 Venice Biennale, was experimental to his core: in his poetry, paintings, photographs, sculptural assemblages, and collages, he broke down conventions, leaving behind a body of extravagant work. He began as a painter of geometric abstractions in the early 1950s, then turned away from his studio and toward the world around him. There he found weathered movie and advertising posters, which he would tear off the walls, affix to canvases, and rip further to develop semi-abstract compositions out of mass media imagery, which he called “double décollages.” Through his collages, he became associated with Raymond Hains, Jacques Villeglé, and François Dufrêne—together known as Les Affichistes. Rotella was also linked to the French Nouveau Réalistes, for reflecting commodity culture, and its excesses and absurdities, in his art.

navigate left
navigate right
Save
Save
share
Share
Save
Save
share
Share
About the work
Provenance
A
ArtRite

Ten silkscreens by Adami V., Baj E., Ceretti M., Colombo G., Del Pezzo L., Pardi G., Rotella M., …

Read more

Ten silkscreens by Adami V., Baj E., Ceretti M., Colombo G., Del Pezzo L., Pardi G., Rotella M., Spoldi A., Tadini E., Varisco G., ed. 36/100

Dimensions of each silkscreen: 50 x 35 cm

Medium
Print
Signature
Each silkscreen is signed and numbered in pencil by the artist
Valerio Adami
Italian, b. 1935
Follow

Valerio Adami is internationally recognized for his seductively rich, psychologically complex paintings, through which he wryly examines Western civilization and modern society. He draws heavily upon the visual idioms of Pop Art, with its cartoonish imagery, flatness, and eye-popping colors. Though they lack visual depth, Adami’s works are layered with meanings; he uses potent imagery to symbolize specific themes, painting a lake to represent the subconscious or a woman in a boat to refer to the passage of life.

Gianni Colombo
Italian, 1937–1993
Follow

Gianni Colombo—a key figure in the rise of Kinetic art in the 1950s and ’60s—worked in diverse media, including painting, sculpture, furniture design, and light installation. A founder of the art movement Gruppo T, Colombo believed art must be kinetic and participatory. His aim was to create interactive spaces that abolished the static boundaries dividing painting, sculpture, and architecture. In 1968, Colombo won first prize at the Venice Biennale with his 1967 work Spazio Elastico (Elastic Space), an interactive piece in which viewers enter a darkened room and are confronted by a shifting cube of luminescent elastic strings. This would ultimately became his most famous work (it was re-mounted at the 2011 Venice Biennale).

Mimmo Rotella
Italian, 1918–2006
Follow

Mimmo Rotella, who represented Italy in the 1964 Venice Biennale, was experimental to his core: in his poetry, paintings, photographs, sculptural assemblages, and collages, he broke down conventions, leaving behind a body of extravagant work. He began as a painter of geometric abstractions in the early 1950s, then turned away from his studio and toward the world around him. There he found weathered movie and advertising posters, which he would tear off the walls, affix to canvases, and rip further to develop semi-abstract compositions out of mass media imagery, which he called “double décollages.” Through his collages, he became associated with Raymond Hains, Jacques Villeglé, and François Dufrêne—together known as Les Affichistes. Rotella was also linked to the French Nouveau Réalistes, for reflecting commodity culture, and its excesses and absurdities, in his art.

Untitled

This is part of a limited edition set.
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
Other works by Valerio Adami
Related works
Most Similar