Walead Beshty, ‘Black Curl (9:6/ YCM/ Six Magnet: Los Angeles, California, April 4th 2013, Fuji Color Crystal Archive Super Type C, EM. No. 199-014, 13213)’, 2013, TWO x TWO

Beshty’s images are rigorously produced in a darkroom by exposing multicolored paper to light according to a predetermined and self-imposed set of rules. In the title, Beshty purposefully makes his practice transparent by informing us of his process, location, date, and materials.

Work may be displayed in horizontal or vertical orientation

Walead Beshty creates seductive works that are seemingly abstract, though their surfaces show details that suggest the artist's unique photogram process. Beshty’s images are rigorously produced in a darkroom by exposing multicolored paper to light according to a predetermined and self-imposed set of rules. In the title, Beshty purposefully makes his practice transparent by informing us of his process, location, date, and materials, ultimately and cleverly communicating the material concerns of his photographic practice. Beshty’s work has been collected by The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; The Guggenheim Museum, New York; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; The University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor; The Victoria and Albert Museum, London; and The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, to name a few. Walead Beshty currently has a solo exhibition at The Power Station in Dallas.

About Walead Beshty

“Photographs operate something like ruins,” Walead Beshty says. “Despite their seeming stasis, they are available to a multitude of narratives, slipping effortlessly between them.” Beshty uses photography to explore how the medium functions or fails as a documentary form. He is best known for his large-scale photograms, as well as series featuring abandoned shopping malls in America. In 2001, Beshty made one of his best-known photographic series, “Travel Pictures,” shot in the then-recently defunct Iraqi Diplomatic Mission in Berlin, and damaged in the airport security’s X-ray scanners; the result was not only a relic of the site but of Beshty’s travel experience. Since 2005, Beshty has been working on his “FedEx Sculptures” in which shatterproof glass boxes are shipped to various destinations in standard FedEx containers—the works’ final appearance is determined by the damage accumulated during travel.

b. 1976, London, United Kingdom, based in Los Angeles, California