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"The Blue Rider (Der Blaue Reiter)", 1912, The second exhibition of the editorial The Blue Rider. Black-and-white. Issued by Hans Goltz Munich. With pictures on boards. Munich, Goltz, 1912. 16 pp., 10 sheets of plates. Color illustrated original brochure (designed by Kandinsky) (slightly bumped and creased, …

Medium
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Published by Hans Goltz, Munich

Wassily Kandinsky pioneered abstract painting in the early 20th century. He believed that geometric forms, lines, and colors could express the inner life of the artist—a theory quite evident in his own explosive paintings, which were often inspired by music. Today, Kandinsky’s canvases sell for tens of millions at auction and belong in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate, among other prestigious institutions. In 1911, Kandinsky played a central role in organizing Der Blaue Reiter, a group of avant-garde artists in Munich that included Franz Marc and Paul Klee. From 1922 to 1933, he taught at the Bauhaus, the historic Weimar institution that brought together artists including Josef Albers, Lazlo Maholy-Nagy, and Piet Mondrian.

High auction record
£33.0m, Sotheby's, 2017
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions
2020
KandinskyGuggenheim Museum Bilbao
2018
Histoire(S) D'Une CollectionCentre Pompidou
2017
A Modern Vision: European Masterworks from the Phillips CollectionKimbell Art Museum
View all

A widely influential modernist painter, Paul Klee combined translucent color panes and Cubist perspectives with a childlike, faux-naïf style. He first rose to prominence as part of the avant-garde Expressionist group known as The Blue Rider alongside Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc, then went on to teach at the Bauhaus alongside Kandinsky. Klee’s lessons on Expressionist styles and theories inspired legions of artists who passed through the academy. Before his death in 1940, Klee became the first living European artist to present a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art; he also mounted exhibitions at Kunsthalle Bern and Kunsthalle Basel. His work has been posthumously shown at countless institutions, including Tate Modern, the Stedelijk Museum, the Guggenheim Museum, the Centre Pompidou, and Moderna Museet and has sold for millions on the secondary market.

High auction record
£4.2m, Christie's, 2011
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions
2019
The Centenary of the Friends of the Kunstmuseum Bern SocietyKunstmuseum Bern
2018
Cosmos KleeZentrum Paul Klee
Paul Klee. AnimalityZentrum Paul Klee
View all

A pioneer of abstract art, Jean (aka Hans) Arp was instrumental in founding the Dada movement and participated actively in Surrealism and Constructivism. In his collages, reliefs, and sculptures, Arp often incorporated waste material such as discarded paper and fabric, and embraced chance and spontaneity as integral components of the artistic process. In Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance (1916), for example, Arp explored the potential for unique compositional relationships that result from inadvertent arrangement of collage elements. Arp’s articulation of biomorphic forms, inspired by organic material and the human figure, was simultaneously explored by Joan Miró and proved to be hugely influential to later 20th-century abstract artists.

High auction record
US$485.0k, Sotheby's, 2014
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions
2021
Walk Through - Expressionism & Classic ModernismGalerie Thomas
2020
From Munch to Uecker - Masterpieces from Classic Modernism to Contemporary ArtGalerie Thomas
2014
The St. Petersburg ParadoxSwiss Institute
View all

Painter, collagist, and sculptor Georges Braque co-founded Cubism with Pablo Picasso and revolutionized 20th-century painting. Throughout his oeuvre, which comprised mostly still lifes, Braque fractured the picture plane in order to explore a variety of viewpoints; he painted in muted tones, fragmenting and reconstructing tablescapes into energetic, geometric forms. Braque also made innovative collages: He helped develop the papier collé technique, pasting imitation wood-grain paper to his Cubist compositions. The artist originally trained as a decorator before turning to fine art. He embraced Impressionism and Fauvism, then solidified his signature Cubist style. After serving in World War I, Braque adopted vibrant color palettes and a freer, more naturalistic style. During his lifetime, the artist enjoyed retrospectives at the Louvre and Kunsthalle Basel. Today, his work belongs in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Centre Pompidou, among others. On the secondary market, a number of Braque’s pieces have sold for eight figures.

High auction record
US$15.8m, Sotheby's, 2013
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions
2018
Histoire(S) D'Une CollectionCentre Pompidou
CubismCentre Pompidou
2016
The Collection of Hermann and Margrit RupfGuggenheim Museum Bilbao
View all

With his embrace of color contrasts and abstraction, Robert Delaunay pioneered the transition from Cubism to lyrical abstraction along with his wife Sonia Delaunay and Frantisek Kupka. The poet Guillaume Apollinaire coined their new style Orphism, in reference to the mythological figure Orpheus. Taking the fragmented Cubist forms as his starting point, Delaunay imbued his work with Fauvist and Neo-Impressionist-inspired color to create a sense of dynamism that appealed to the senses. His first “Eiffel Tower” series (1910-12) exemplifies what Delaunay referred to as his destructive phase, an exploration of the potential of light to disintegrate a solid structure. He became one of the earliest completely non-representational painters with his “Windows” (1912) and “Colored Discs” (1913) series. Orphism greatly influenced the Munich-based group of painters known as Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), including Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2018
Histoire(S) D'Une CollectionCentre Pompidou
CubismCentre Pompidou
2016
East Building Permanent CollectionNational Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
View all

A founding member of Fauvism, Andre Derain is known for his innovative landscape and cityscape paintings in which he transforms the subject with bold and largely unrealistic colors. Early in his career Derain worked closely with fellow Fauves Maurice de Vlaminck and Henri Matisse, the latter helping convince Derain’s family to let him pursue a career in painting. In Derain’s celebrated depictions of London’s Thames River and Tower Bridge, he applied each color separately in dots or dabs, inviting associations with the Divisionist technique of Paul Signac and Georges Seurat. Derain’s later work features more subtle tones and new subjects, including portraiture and still life. Inspired by his friendship with Pablo Picasso, Derain’s post-Fauve works show an engagement with both classicism and Cubism, and this so called “classical” style earned him widespread recognition throughout Europe and the United States.

High auction record
£16.3m, Sotheby's, 2010
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2018
Histoire(S) D'Une CollectionCentre Pompidou
CubismCentre Pompidou
2012
French Art 1900-1930Statens Museum for Kunst
View all

Natalia Goncharova gained recognition in the West through her set and costume designs produced for Sergei Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, but she was also a leading avant-garde artist in her own right in early 20th-century Russia. A painter, stage and costume designer, printmaker, and illustrator, Goncharova’s work spanned a range of modernist styles, including Futurism, Cubism, Rayonism, and Neo-Primitivism, finding inspiration in Russian folk art and often depicting group scenes of women. She was married to the painter Mikhail Larionov; the two were controversial in Russia for what were thought to be their radical lifestyles. In 1910, Goncharova was tried on charges of pornography after exhibiting a collection of her nude paintings.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2021
A Future We Begin to Feel: Women Artists 1921–1971Rosenberg & Co.
2019
GRAPHIQUES SANS PAREIL - La Crème de La CollectionOmnibus Gallery
Natalia GoncharovaTate
View all

Painter and printmaker Erich Heckel is considered one of Germany’s most important artists; he was instrumental in launching Die Brücke (The Bridge) movement while studying architecture at the University of Dresden in 1905. His early work shifted in tone as he moved from painting in nature to reacting to the psychological isolation of modern urban life in Berlin. Heckel designed starkly graphic prints of figures—often depicted in states of psychological distress—within simplified compositions, and he was influenced by the literature and philosophy of Nietzsche and Dostoevsky. He continued to work through military service in World War II, and later became active in socialist artists’ organizations, including Novembergruppe and the Arbeitsrat für Kunst. During the Second World War, the Nazis labeled Heckel a “degenerate” artist—his studio was destroyed and 729 works were confiscated from public collections.

High auction record
£3.0m, Christie's, 2015
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2021
THANK YOU! Artists, friends, collectors, museums, colleagues, family and staffHenze & Ketterer & Triebold
Walk Through - Expressionism & Classic ModernismGalerie Thomas
2020
MasterpiecesLudorff
View all

A leading figure in the early-20th-century German Expressionist group Die Brücke, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner produced paintings, prints, and sculptures that opposed the conventions of academic art. His nudes, landscapes, and scenes of urban life on the eve of World War I are known for their unsettling effects of psychological tension and eroticism, while his powerful, crudely executed black-and-white woodcuts illustrated many books and magazines, including Germany’s leading avant-garde periodical Der Sturm. Albrecht Dürer was a lifelong influence on Kirchner, but painters such as Edvard Munch and Vincent van Gogh, as well as African and Polynesian art, inspired his use of bright colors, simplified forms, and malevolent, mask-like faces. His art was labeled as “degenerate” by the Nazis in the 1930s, and he would commit suicide in 1937.

High auction record
US$38.1m, Christie's, 2006
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions
2019
Modern & tribal mastersBeck & Eggeling
2018
WOW! The Heidi Horten CollectionLeopold Museum
Painter. Mentor. Magician.: Otto Mueller And His Network In WrocławHamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin
View all
Selected exhibitions
2021
Forum Gallery at Art on Paper 2021Forum Gallery
2018
Annely Juda Fine Art at FIAC 2018Annely Juda Fine Art
2014
A Journey into the EUROPEAN AVANT-GARDE: The Influence of CubismGilden's Art Gallery
View all

Otto Mueller’s Expressionist paintings and prints developed from an earlier style deeply rooted in Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, and Jugendstil (Art Nouveau), maintaining the latter’s emphasis on graceful silhouettes. Mueller distinguished himself from his Die Brücke peers by focusing more on harmonious simplification of color than expressing raw emotion, as exemplified by Reclining Nude in the Dunes (1923). Representative of the classically elegant female nudes in landscapes for which he is most celebrated, the tempera painting depicts a woman lying face down in the sand—the strong contours of her body echo the desert topography and evoke the communion of humans and nature, rather than intense emotion more typical of Expressionism. The pinnacle of his graphic art is “Gypsy-Portfolio” (1927), a series of nine boldly colored lithographs.

Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
Selected exhibitions
2021
Recent Acquisitions Fall 2021Ludorff
2018
Expressionist PrintsGalerie Thomas
Painter. Mentor. Magician.: Otto Mueller And His Network In WrocławHamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin
View all
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2021
WILD/SCHÖN Tiere in der KunstKunsthalle in Emden
Recent Acquisitions Fall 2021Ludorff
2020
MasterpiecesLudorff
View all

A wood carver and draftsman, Emil Nolde studied arts and crafts early on and eventually took up painting and printmaking as a full time profession at the age of 31. His intensely colored, gestural oil paintings of urban nightlife, biblical scenes, flower motifs, and landscapes are considered among the best examples of German Expressionism and admired for their intense psychological power. Traces of Primitivism are evident in his incorporation of exotic figures and masks, especially in his later watercolors inspired by a journey to the South Pacific. Likewise, among Die Brücke, a group of German Expressionists with whom he was associated, Nolde was considered the preeminent intaglio printmaker. He achieved rich tonal effects and textural results with a unique treatment of the copper plate.

High auction record
US$7.3m, Christie's, 2020
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2019
A German Legend: Emil Nolde and the Nazi RegimeHamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin
2018
Emil NoldeZentrum Paul Klee
2014
Emil Nolde: RetrospectiveLouisiana Museum of Modern Art
View all

A key Expressionist painter of the early 20th century, Max Pechstein produced decorative and colorful paintings that borrowed from Vincent Van Gogh, Henri Matisse, and the Fauves. As a member of Die Brücke, a group of German Expressionists who took a primitivist approach to painting, Pechstein worked closely with Erich Heckel and Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. He travelled to Palau in the South Pacific in 1914, after which his paintings increasingly displayed elements of Primitivism, such as thick black lines and angular figures. Pechstein was also a prolific printmaker, making over 900 prints over the course of his career. Instrumental in founding the Novembergruppe in 1918, a left-wing artists’ group demanding artist involvement in creating social policies, Pechstein was later denounced by the Nazis and hundreds of his paintings were removed from German museums.

High auction record
€3.5m, Ketterer Kunst, 2011
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions
2021
THANK YOU! Artists, friends, collectors, museums, colleagues, family and staffHenze & Ketterer & Triebold
2020
Evolving Modernity - From Picasso and Chagall to Schlemmer and PechsteinGalerie Thomas
2018
WOW! The Heidi Horten CollectionLeopold Museum
View all

Perhaps the most influential artist of the 20th century, Pablo Picasso may be best known for pioneering Cubism and fracturing the two-dimensional picture plane in order to convey three-dimensional space. Inspired by African and Iberian art, he also contributed to the rise of Surrealism and Expressionism. Picasso’s sizable oeuvre grew to include over 20,000 paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures,ceramics, theater sets, and costume designs. He painted his most famous work, Guernica (1937), in response to the Spanish Civil War; the totemic grisaille canvas remains a definitive work of anti-war art. At auction, a number of Picasso’s paintings have sold for more than $100 million. The indefatigable artist has been the subject of exhibitions at the world’s most prestigious institutions, from the Museum of Modern Art and Centre Pompidou to the Stedelijk Museum and Tate Modern.

High auction record
US$179.4m, Christie's, 2015
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions
2019
Picasso – Birth of a GeniusUCCA
2018
The EY Exhibition: PICASSO 1932 – Love, Fame, TragedyTate
2017
Picasso 1932. Année érotiqueMusée Picasso Paris
View all
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2020
Contemplative and Happy ArtHenze & Ketterer & Triebold
MasterpiecesLudorff
2019
That was Berlin!: Shining and dark sides of a metropolis between the world warsJörg Maass Kunsthandel
View all

"The Blue Rider (Der Blaue Reiter)", 1912, The Second Exhibition Catalogue, Cover by Kandinsky, Published by Hans Goltz Munich, RARE, 1912

Print on paper
5 9/10 × 4 7/10 in
15 × 12 cm
.
Sold
Certificate
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
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"The Blue Rider (Der Blaue Reiter)", 1912, The second exhibition of the editorial The …

Medium
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Published by Hans Goltz, Munich

Wassily Kandinsky pioneered abstract painting in the early 20th century. He believed that geometric forms, lines, and colors could express the inner life of the artist—a theory quite evident in his own explosive paintings, which were often inspired by music. Today, Kandinsky’s canvases sell for tens of millions at auction and belong in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Tate, among other prestigious institutions. In 1911, Kandinsky played a central role in organizing Der Blaue Reiter, a group of avant-garde artists in Munich that included Franz Marc and Paul Klee. From 1922 to 1933, he taught at the Bauhaus, the historic Weimar institution that brought together artists including Josef Albers, Lazlo Maholy-Nagy, and Piet Mondrian.

High auction record
£33.0m, Sotheby's, 2017
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions (3)

A widely influential modernist painter, Paul Klee combined translucent color panes and Cubist perspectives with a childlike, faux-naïf style. He first rose to prominence as part of the avant-garde Expressionist group known as The Blue Rider alongside Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc, then went on to teach at the Bauhaus alongside Kandinsky. Klee’s lessons on Expressionist styles and theories inspired legions of artists who passed through the academy. Before his death in 1940, Klee became the first living European artist to present a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art; he also mounted exhibitions at Kunsthalle Bern and Kunsthalle Basel. His work has been posthumously shown at countless institutions, including Tate Modern, the Stedelijk Museum, the Guggenheim Museum, the Centre Pompidou, and Moderna Museet and has sold for millions on the secondary market.

High auction record
£4.2m, Christie's, 2011
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions (3)

A pioneer of abstract art, Jean (aka Hans) Arp was instrumental in founding the Dada movement and participated actively in Surrealism and Constructivism. In his collages, reliefs, and sculptures, Arp often incorporated waste material such as discarded paper and fabric, and embraced chance and spontaneity as integral components of the artistic process. In Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance (1916), for example, Arp explored the potential for unique compositional relationships that result from inadvertent arrangement of collage elements. Arp’s articulation of biomorphic forms, inspired by organic material and the human figure, was simultaneously explored by Joan Miró and proved to be hugely influential to later 20th-century abstract artists.

High auction record
US$485.0k, Sotheby's, 2014
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Painter, collagist, and sculptor Georges Braque co-founded Cubism with Pablo Picasso and revolutionized 20th-century painting. Throughout his oeuvre, which comprised mostly still lifes, Braque fractured the picture plane in order to explore a variety of viewpoints; he painted in muted tones, fragmenting and reconstructing tablescapes into energetic, geometric forms. Braque also made innovative collages: He helped develop the papier collé technique, pasting imitation wood-grain paper to his Cubist compositions. The artist originally trained as a decorator before turning to fine art. He embraced Impressionism and Fauvism, then solidified his signature Cubist style. After serving in World War I, Braque adopted vibrant color palettes and a freer, more naturalistic style. During his lifetime, the artist enjoyed retrospectives at the Louvre and Kunsthalle Basel. Today, his work belongs in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Centre Pompidou, among others. On the secondary market, a number of Braque’s pieces have sold for eight figures.

High auction record
US$15.8m, Sotheby's, 2013
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

With his embrace of color contrasts and abstraction, Robert Delaunay pioneered the transition from Cubism to lyrical abstraction along with his wife Sonia Delaunay and Frantisek Kupka. The poet Guillaume Apollinaire coined their new style Orphism, in reference to the mythological figure Orpheus. Taking the fragmented Cubist forms as his starting point, Delaunay imbued his work with Fauvist and Neo-Impressionist-inspired color to create a sense of dynamism that appealed to the senses. His first “Eiffel Tower” series (1910-12) exemplifies what Delaunay referred to as his destructive phase, an exploration of the potential of light to disintegrate a solid structure. He became one of the earliest completely non-representational painters with his “Windows” (1912) and “Colored Discs” (1913) series. Orphism greatly influenced the Munich-based group of painters known as Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), including Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

A founding member of Fauvism, Andre Derain is known for his innovative landscape and cityscape paintings in which he transforms the subject with bold and largely unrealistic colors. Early in his career Derain worked closely with fellow Fauves Maurice de Vlaminck and Henri Matisse, the latter helping convince Derain’s family to let him pursue a career in painting. In Derain’s celebrated depictions of London’s Thames River and Tower Bridge, he applied each color separately in dots or dabs, inviting associations with the Divisionist technique of Paul Signac and Georges Seurat. Derain’s later work features more subtle tones and new subjects, including portraiture and still life. Inspired by his friendship with Pablo Picasso, Derain’s post-Fauve works show an engagement with both classicism and Cubism, and this so called “classical” style earned him widespread recognition throughout Europe and the United States.

High auction record
£16.3m, Sotheby's, 2010
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Natalia Goncharova gained recognition in the West through her set and costume designs produced for Sergei Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, but she was also a leading avant-garde artist in her own right in early 20th-century Russia. A painter, stage and costume designer, printmaker, and illustrator, Goncharova’s work spanned a range of modernist styles, including Futurism, Cubism, Rayonism, and Neo-Primitivism, finding inspiration in Russian folk art and often depicting group scenes of women. She was married to the painter Mikhail Larionov; the two were controversial in Russia for what were thought to be their radical lifestyles. In 1910, Goncharova was tried on charges of pornography after exhibiting a collection of her nude paintings.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Painter and printmaker Erich Heckel is considered one of Germany’s most important artists; he was instrumental in launching Die Brücke (The Bridge) movement while studying architecture at the University of Dresden in 1905. His early work shifted in tone as he moved from painting in nature to reacting to the psychological isolation of modern urban life in Berlin. Heckel designed starkly graphic prints of figures—often depicted in states of psychological distress—within simplified compositions, and he was influenced by the literature and philosophy of Nietzsche and Dostoevsky. He continued to work through military service in World War II, and later became active in socialist artists’ organizations, including Novembergruppe and the Arbeitsrat für Kunst. During the Second World War, the Nazis labeled Heckel a “degenerate” artist—his studio was destroyed and 729 works were confiscated from public collections.

High auction record
£3.0m, Christie's, 2015
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

A leading figure in the early-20th-century German Expressionist group Die Brücke, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner produced paintings, prints, and sculptures that opposed the conventions of academic art. His nudes, landscapes, and scenes of urban life on the eve of World War I are known for their unsettling effects of psychological tension and eroticism, while his powerful, crudely executed black-and-white woodcuts illustrated many books and magazines, including Germany’s leading avant-garde periodical Der Sturm. Albrecht Dürer was a lifelong influence on Kirchner, but painters such as Edvard Munch and Vincent van Gogh, as well as African and Polynesian art, inspired his use of bright colors, simplified forms, and malevolent, mask-like faces. His art was labeled as “degenerate” by the Nazis in the 1930s, and he would commit suicide in 1937.

High auction record
US$38.1m, Christie's, 2006
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Otto Mueller’s Expressionist paintings and prints developed from an earlier style deeply rooted in Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, and Jugendstil (Art Nouveau), maintaining the latter’s emphasis on graceful silhouettes. Mueller distinguished himself from his Die Brücke peers by focusing more on harmonious simplification of color than expressing raw emotion, as exemplified by Reclining Nude in the Dunes (1923). Representative of the classically elegant female nudes in landscapes for which he is most celebrated, the tempera painting depicts a woman lying face down in the sand—the strong contours of her body echo the desert topography and evoke the communion of humans and nature, rather than intense emotion more typical of Expressionism. The pinnacle of his graphic art is “Gypsy-Portfolio” (1927), a series of nine boldly colored lithographs.

Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
Selected exhibitions (3)
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

A wood carver and draftsman, Emil Nolde studied arts and crafts early on and eventually took up painting and printmaking as a full time profession at the age of 31. His intensely colored, gestural oil paintings of urban nightlife, biblical scenes, flower motifs, and landscapes are considered among the best examples of German Expressionism and admired for their intense psychological power. Traces of Primitivism are evident in his incorporation of exotic figures and masks, especially in his later watercolors inspired by a journey to the South Pacific. Likewise, among Die Brücke, a group of German Expressionists with whom he was associated, Nolde was considered the preeminent intaglio printmaker. He achieved rich tonal effects and textural results with a unique treatment of the copper plate.

High auction record
US$7.3m, Christie's, 2020
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

A key Expressionist painter of the early 20th century, Max Pechstein produced decorative and colorful paintings that borrowed from Vincent Van Gogh, Henri Matisse, and the Fauves. As a member of Die Brücke, a group of German Expressionists who took a primitivist approach to painting, Pechstein worked closely with Erich Heckel and Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. He travelled to Palau in the South Pacific in 1914, after which his paintings increasingly displayed elements of Primitivism, such as thick black lines and angular figures. Pechstein was also a prolific printmaker, making over 900 prints over the course of his career. Instrumental in founding the Novembergruppe in 1918, a left-wing artists’ group demanding artist involvement in creating social policies, Pechstein was later denounced by the Nazis and hundreds of his paintings were removed from German museums.

High auction record
€3.5m, Ketterer Kunst, 2011
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions (3)

Perhaps the most influential artist of the 20th century, Pablo Picasso may be best known for pioneering Cubism and fracturing the two-dimensional picture plane in order to convey three-dimensional space. Inspired by African and Iberian art, he also contributed to the rise of Surrealism and Expressionism. Picasso’s sizable oeuvre grew to include over 20,000 paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures,ceramics, theater sets, and costume designs. He painted his most famous work, Guernica (1937), in response to the Spanish Civil War; the totemic grisaille canvas remains a definitive work of anti-war art. At auction, a number of Picasso’s paintings have sold for more than $100 million. The indefatigable artist has been the subject of exhibitions at the world’s most prestigious institutions, from the Museum of Modern Art and Centre Pompidou to the Stedelijk Museum and Tate Modern.

High auction record
US$179.4m, Christie's, 2015
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Series by this artist

Other works from ARTephemera (1930-present)
Other works by Wassily Kandinsky
Other works from VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Related works