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"The Blue Rider (Der Blaue Reiter)", 1912, The Second Exhibition Catalogue, Cover by Kandinsky, Published by Hans Goltz Munich, RARE, 1912

Print on paper
5 9/10 × 4 7/10 in
15 × 12 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$2,500
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Free shipping worldwide
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Follow

"The Blue Rider (Der Blaue Reiter)", 1912, The second exhibition of the editorial The …

Read more

"The Blue Rider (Der Blaue Reiter)", 1912, The second exhibition of the editorial The Blue Rider. Black-and-white. Issued by Hans Goltz Munich. With pictures on boards. Munich, Goltz, 1912. 16 pp., 10 sheets of plates. Color illustrated original brochure (designed by Kandinsky) (slightly bumped and creased, …

Read more
Medium
Print
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Published by Hans Goltz, Munich
Wassily Kandinsky
Russian, 1866–1944
Follow

An early champion of abstract painting, Wassily Kandinsky is known for his lyrical style and innovative theories on nonfigurative art. In his 1910 treatise Concerning the Spiritual In Art, Kandinsky made famous his belief that abstract colors and forms can be used to express the “inner life” of the artist. Kandinsky taught this and other lessons at the Bauhaus, the historic Weimar institution that brought together artists including Joseph Albers, Lazlo Maholy-Nagy, and Piet Mondrian, amongst others. Kandinsky had a strong interest in the relationship between art and classical music, this theme apparent in his orchestral Composition VI (1913), where colliding forms and colors move across the canvas. In 1911 Kandinsky played a central role in organizing Der Blaue Reiter, a group of artists named in part after Kandinsky’s favorite color, blue.

Paul Klee
German, 1879–1940
Follow

Known for his unique pictorial language and innovative teachings at the Bauhaus, Paul Klee had far-reaching influence on 20th-century modernism. In an early attempt to master color, he associated himself with the group Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), working closely with friend and future Bauhaus colleague Wassily Kandinsky. While engaged with artistic theory, Klee also admired children’s art, wanting his own style to be similarly unaffected. And his dream-like pictures made him popular with the Surrealists, though he never officially became one. Klee’s work can be humorous, his fantastic drawn subjects conveying a playful sense of absurdity, as with his famous Twittering Machine (1922). Later in his career, he began to build up thicker painted surfaces and simplify his compositions, replacing precise line-work with fewer, bolder forms. Klee’s art and lessons on color theory would greatly impact later generations of artists, including, significantly, the Abstract Expressionists and Color Field painters.

Hans Arp
German-French, 1886–1966
Follow

A pioneer of abstract art, Jean (aka Hans) Arp was instrumental in founding the Dada movement and participated actively in Surrealism and Constructivism. In his collages, reliefs, and sculptures, Arp often incorporated waste material such as discarded paper and fabric, and embraced chance and spontaneity as integral components of the artistic process. In Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance (1916), for example, Arp explored the potential for unique compositional relationships that result from inadvertent arrangement of collage elements. Arp’s articulation of biomorphic forms, inspired by organic material and the human figure, was simultaneously explored by Joan Miró and proved to be hugely influential to later 20th-century abstract artists.

Georges Braque
French, 1882–1963
Follow

French painter, collagist and sculptor Georges Braque is, along with Pablo Picasso, renowned as the co-founder of Cubism, which revolutionized 20th-century painting. In his work, objects are fragmented and reconstructed into geometric forms, fracturing the picture plane in order to explore a variety of viewpoints. “The hard-and-fast rules of perspective … were a ghastly mistake which…has taken four centuries to redress,” he said in 1957. Merging aspects of the sculptural with the pictorial, Braque was also an innovator in the use of collage, inventing a technique known as papier collé, which he first explored in one early work Fruit Dish and Glass (1912) by attaching pieces of wallpaper to a charcoal drawing. This approach deeply influenced not only his contemporaries but generations of artists from Modernism to the present.

Robert Delaunay
French, 1885–1941
Follow

With his embrace of color contrasts and abstraction, Robert Delaunay pioneered the transition from Cubism to lyrical abstraction along with his wife Sonia Delaunay and Frantisek Kupka. The poet Guillaume Apollinaire coined their new style Orphism, in reference to the mythological figure Orpheus. Taking the fragmented Cubist forms as his starting point, Delaunay imbued his work with Fauvist and Neo-Impressionist-inspired color to create a sense of dynamism that appealed to the senses. His first “Eiffel Tower” series (1910-12) exemplifies what Delaunay referred to as his destructive phase, an exploration of the potential of light to disintegrate a solid structure. He became one of the earliest completely non-representational painters with his “Windows” (1912) and “Colored Discs” (1913) series. Orphism greatly influenced the Munich-based group of painters known as Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), including Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc.

André Derain
French, 1880–1954
Follow

A founding member of Fauvism, Andre Derain is known for his innovative landscape and cityscape paintings in which he transforms the subject with bold and largely unrealistic colors. Early in his career Derain worked closely with fellow Fauves Maurice de Vlaminck and Henri Matisse, the latter helping convince Derain’s family to let him pursue a career in painting. In Derain’s celebrated depictions of London’s Thames River and Tower Bridge, he applied each color separately in dots or dabs, inviting associations with the Divisionist technique of Paul Signac and Georges Seurat. Derain’s later work features more subtle tones and new subjects, including portraiture and still life. Inspired by his friendship with Pablo Picasso, Derain’s post-Fauve works show an engagement with both classicism and Cubism, and this so called “classical” style earned him widespread recognition throughout Europe and the United States.

Natalia Goncharova
Russian, 1881–1962
Follow

Natalia Goncharova gained recognition in the West through her set and costume designs produced for Sergei Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, but she was also a leading avant-garde artist in her own right in early 20th-century Russia. A painter, stage and costume designer, printmaker, and illustrator, Goncharova’s work spanned a range of modernist styles, including Futurism, Cubism, Rayonism, and Neo-Primitivism, finding inspiration in Russian folk art and often depicting group scenes of women. She was married to the painter Mikhail Larionov; the two were controversial in Russia for what were thought to be their radical lifestyles. In 1910, Goncharova was tried on charges of pornography after exhibiting a collection of her nude paintings.

Erich Heckel
German, 1883–1970
Follow

Painter and printmaker Erich Heckel is considered one of Germany’s most important artists; he was instrumental in launching Die Brücke (The Bridge) movement while studying architecture at the University of Dresden in 1905. His early work shifted in tone as he moved from painting in nature to reacting to the psychological isolation of modern urban life in Berlin. Heckel designed starkly graphic prints of figures—often depicted in states of psychological distress—within simplified compositions, and he was influenced by the literature and philosophy of Nietzsche and Dostoevsky. He continued to work through military service in World War II, and later became active in socialist artists’ organizations, including Novembergruppe and the Arbeitsrat für Kunst. During the Second World War, the Nazis labeled Heckel a “degenerate” artist—his studio was destroyed and 729 works were confiscated from public collections.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
German, 1880–1938
Follow

A leading figure in the early-20th-century German Expressionist group Die Brücke, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner produced paintings, prints, and sculptures that opposed the conventions of academic art. His nudes, landscapes, and scenes of urban life on the eve of World War I are known for their unsettling effects of psychological tension and eroticism, while his powerful, crudely executed black-and-white woodcuts illustrated many books and magazines, including Germany’s leading avant-garde periodical Der Sturm. Albrecht Dürer was a lifelong influence on Kirchner, but painters such as Edvard Munch and Vincent van Gogh, as well as African and Polynesian art, inspired his use of bright colors, simplified forms, and malevolent, mask-like faces. His art was labeled as “degenerate” by the Nazis in the 1930s, and he would commit suicide in 1937.

Otto Mueller
German, 1874–1930
Follow

Otto Mueller’s Expressionist paintings and prints developed from an earlier style deeply rooted in Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, and Jugendstil (Art Nouveau), maintaining the latter’s emphasis on graceful silhouettes. Mueller distinguished himself from his Die Brücke peers by focusing more on harmonious simplification of color than expressing raw emotion, as exemplified by Reclining Nude in the Dunes (1923). Representative of the classically elegant female nudes in landscapes for which he is most celebrated, the tempera painting depicts a woman lying face down in the sand—the strong contours of her body echo the desert topography and evoke the communion of humans and nature, rather than intense emotion more typical of Expressionism. The pinnacle of his graphic art is “Gypsy-Portfolio” (1927), a series of nine boldly colored lithographs.

Emil Nolde
German, 1867–1956
Follow

A wood carver and draftsman, Emil Nolde studied arts and crafts early on and eventually took up painting and printmaking as a full time profession at the age of 31. His intensely colored, gestural oil paintings of urban nightlife, biblical scenes, flower motifs, and landscapes are considered among the best examples of German Expressionism and admired for their intense psychological power. Traces of Primitivism are evident in his incorporation of exotic figures and masks, especially in his later watercolors inspired by a journey to the South Pacific. Likewise, among Die Brücke, a group of German Expressionists with whom he was associated, Nolde was considered the preeminent intaglio printmaker. He achieved rich tonal effects and textural results with a unique treatment of the copper plate.

Max Pechstein
German, 1881–1955
Follow

A key Expressionist painter of the early 20th century, Max Pechstein produced decorative and colorful paintings that borrowed from Vincent Van Gogh, Henri Matisse, and the Fauves. As a member of Die Brücke, a group of German Expressionists who took a primitivist approach to painting, Pechstein worked closely with Erich Heckel and Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. He travelled to Palau in the South Pacific in 1914, after which his paintings increasingly displayed elements of Primitivism, such as thick black lines and angular figures. Pechstein was also a prolific printmaker, making over 900 prints over the course of his career. Instrumental in founding the Novembergruppe in 1918, a left-wing artists’ group demanding artist involvement in creating social policies, Pechstein was later denounced by the Nazis and hundreds of his paintings were removed from German museums.

Pablo Picasso
Spanish, 1881–1973
Follow

A prolific and tireless innovator of art forms, Pablo Picasso impacted the course of 20th-century art with unparalleled magnitude. Inspired by African and Iberian art and developments in the world around him, Picasso contributed significantly to a number of artistic movements, notably Cubism, Surrealism, Neoclassicism, and Expressionism. Along with Georges Braque, Picasso is best known for pioneering Cubism in an attempt to reconcile three-dimensional space with the two-dimensional picture plane, once asking, “Are we to paint what’s on the face, what’s inside the face, or what’s behind it?” Responding to the Spanish Civil War, he painted his most famous work, Guernica (1937), whose violent images of anguished figures rendered in grisaille made it a definitive work of anti-war art. “Painting is not made to decorate apartments,” he said. “It’s an offensive and defensive weapon against the enemy.” Picasso’s sizable oeuvre includes over 20,000 paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, theater sets, and costume designs.

Navigate left
Navigate right
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Follow

"The Blue Rider (Der Blaue Reiter)", 1912, The second exhibition of the editorial The …

Read more

"The Blue Rider (Der Blaue Reiter)", 1912, The second exhibition of the editorial The Blue Rider. Black-and-white. Issued by Hans Goltz Munich. With pictures on boards. Munich, Goltz, 1912. 16 pp., 10 sheets of plates. Color illustrated original brochure (designed by Kandinsky) (slightly bumped and creased, …

Read more
Medium
Print
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Published by Hans Goltz, Munich
Wassily Kandinsky
Russian, 1866–1944
Follow

An early champion of abstract painting, Wassily Kandinsky is known for his lyrical style and innovative theories on nonfigurative art. In his 1910 treatise Concerning the Spiritual In Art, Kandinsky made famous his belief that abstract colors and forms can be used to express the “inner life” of the artist. Kandinsky taught this and other lessons at the Bauhaus, the historic Weimar institution that brought together artists including Joseph Albers, Lazlo Maholy-Nagy, and Piet Mondrian, amongst others. Kandinsky had a strong interest in the relationship between art and classical music, this theme apparent in his orchestral Composition VI (1913), where colliding forms and colors move across the canvas. In 1911 Kandinsky played a central role in organizing Der Blaue Reiter, a group of artists named in part after Kandinsky’s favorite color, blue.

Paul Klee
German, 1879–1940
Follow

Known for his unique pictorial language and innovative teachings at the Bauhaus, Paul Klee had far-reaching influence on 20th-century modernism. In an early attempt to master color, he associated himself with the group Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), working closely with friend and future Bauhaus colleague Wassily Kandinsky. While engaged with artistic theory, Klee also admired children’s art, wanting his own style to be similarly unaffected. And his dream-like pictures made him popular with the Surrealists, though he never officially became one. Klee’s work can be humorous, his fantastic drawn subjects conveying a playful sense of absurdity, as with his famous Twittering Machine (1922). Later in his career, he began to build up thicker painted surfaces and simplify his compositions, replacing precise line-work with fewer, bolder forms. Klee’s art and lessons on color theory would greatly impact later generations of artists, including, significantly, the Abstract Expressionists and Color Field painters.

Hans Arp
German-French, 1886–1966
Follow

A pioneer of abstract art, Jean (aka Hans) Arp was instrumental in founding the Dada movement and participated actively in Surrealism and Constructivism. In his collages, reliefs, and sculptures, Arp often incorporated waste material such as discarded paper and fabric, and embraced chance and spontaneity as integral components of the artistic process. In Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance (1916), for example, Arp explored the potential for unique compositional relationships that result from inadvertent arrangement of collage elements. Arp’s articulation of biomorphic forms, inspired by organic material and the human figure, was simultaneously explored by Joan Miró and proved to be hugely influential to later 20th-century abstract artists.

Georges Braque
French, 1882–1963
Follow

French painter, collagist and sculptor Georges Braque is, along with Pablo Picasso, renowned as the co-founder of Cubism, which revolutionized 20th-century painting. In his work, objects are fragmented and reconstructed into geometric forms, fracturing the picture plane in order to explore a variety of viewpoints. “The hard-and-fast rules of perspective … were a ghastly mistake which…has taken four centuries to redress,” he said in 1957. Merging aspects of the sculptural with the pictorial, Braque was also an innovator in the use of collage, inventing a technique known as papier collé, which he first explored in one early work Fruit Dish and Glass (1912) by attaching pieces of wallpaper to a charcoal drawing. This approach deeply influenced not only his contemporaries but generations of artists from Modernism to the present.

Robert Delaunay
French, 1885–1941
Follow

With his embrace of color contrasts and abstraction, Robert Delaunay pioneered the transition from Cubism to lyrical abstraction along with his wife Sonia Delaunay and Frantisek Kupka. The poet Guillaume Apollinaire coined their new style Orphism, in reference to the mythological figure Orpheus. Taking the fragmented Cubist forms as his starting point, Delaunay imbued his work with Fauvist and Neo-Impressionist-inspired color to create a sense of dynamism that appealed to the senses. His first “Eiffel Tower” series (1910-12) exemplifies what Delaunay referred to as his destructive phase, an exploration of the potential of light to disintegrate a solid structure. He became one of the earliest completely non-representational painters with his “Windows” (1912) and “Colored Discs” (1913) series. Orphism greatly influenced the Munich-based group of painters known as Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), including Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc.

André Derain
French, 1880–1954
Follow

A founding member of Fauvism, Andre Derain is known for his innovative landscape and cityscape paintings in which he transforms the subject with bold and largely unrealistic colors. Early in his career Derain worked closely with fellow Fauves Maurice de Vlaminck and Henri Matisse, the latter helping convince Derain’s family to let him pursue a career in painting. In Derain’s celebrated depictions of London’s Thames River and Tower Bridge, he applied each color separately in dots or dabs, inviting associations with the Divisionist technique of Paul Signac and Georges Seurat. Derain’s later work features more subtle tones and new subjects, including portraiture and still life. Inspired by his friendship with Pablo Picasso, Derain’s post-Fauve works show an engagement with both classicism and Cubism, and this so called “classical” style earned him widespread recognition throughout Europe and the United States.

Natalia Goncharova
Russian, 1881–1962
Follow

Natalia Goncharova gained recognition in the West through her set and costume designs produced for Sergei Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, but she was also a leading avant-garde artist in her own right in early 20th-century Russia. A painter, stage and costume designer, printmaker, and illustrator, Goncharova’s work spanned a range of modernist styles, including Futurism, Cubism, Rayonism, and Neo-Primitivism, finding inspiration in Russian folk art and often depicting group scenes of women. She was married to the painter Mikhail Larionov; the two were controversial in Russia for what were thought to be their radical lifestyles. In 1910, Goncharova was tried on charges of pornography after exhibiting a collection of her nude paintings.

Erich Heckel
German, 1883–1970
Follow

Painter and printmaker Erich Heckel is considered one of Germany’s most important artists; he was instrumental in launching Die Brücke (The Bridge) movement while studying architecture at the University of Dresden in 1905. His early work shifted in tone as he moved from painting in nature to reacting to the psychological isolation of modern urban life in Berlin. Heckel designed starkly graphic prints of figures—often depicted in states of psychological distress—within simplified compositions, and he was influenced by the literature and philosophy of Nietzsche and Dostoevsky. He continued to work through military service in World War II, and later became active in socialist artists’ organizations, including Novembergruppe and the Arbeitsrat für Kunst. During the Second World War, the Nazis labeled Heckel a “degenerate” artist—his studio was destroyed and 729 works were confiscated from public collections.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
German, 1880–1938
Follow

A leading figure in the early-20th-century German Expressionist group Die Brücke, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner produced paintings, prints, and sculptures that opposed the conventions of academic art. His nudes, landscapes, and scenes of urban life on the eve of World War I are known for their unsettling effects of psychological tension and eroticism, while his powerful, crudely executed black-and-white woodcuts illustrated many books and magazines, including Germany’s leading avant-garde periodical Der Sturm. Albrecht Dürer was a lifelong influence on Kirchner, but painters such as Edvard Munch and Vincent van Gogh, as well as African and Polynesian art, inspired his use of bright colors, simplified forms, and malevolent, mask-like faces. His art was labeled as “degenerate” by the Nazis in the 1930s, and he would commit suicide in 1937.

Otto Mueller
German, 1874–1930
Follow

Otto Mueller’s Expressionist paintings and prints developed from an earlier style deeply rooted in Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, and Jugendstil (Art Nouveau), maintaining the latter’s emphasis on graceful silhouettes. Mueller distinguished himself from his Die Brücke peers by focusing more on harmonious simplification of color than expressing raw emotion, as exemplified by Reclining Nude in the Dunes (1923). Representative of the classically elegant female nudes in landscapes for which he is most celebrated, the tempera painting depicts a woman lying face down in the sand—the strong contours of her body echo the desert topography and evoke the communion of humans and nature, rather than intense emotion more typical of Expressionism. The pinnacle of his graphic art is “Gypsy-Portfolio” (1927), a series of nine boldly colored lithographs.

Emil Nolde
German, 1867–1956
Follow

A wood carver and draftsman, Emil Nolde studied arts and crafts early on and eventually took up painting and printmaking as a full time profession at the age of 31. His intensely colored, gestural oil paintings of urban nightlife, biblical scenes, flower motifs, and landscapes are considered among the best examples of German Expressionism and admired for their intense psychological power. Traces of Primitivism are evident in his incorporation of exotic figures and masks, especially in his later watercolors inspired by a journey to the South Pacific. Likewise, among Die Brücke, a group of German Expressionists with whom he was associated, Nolde was considered the preeminent intaglio printmaker. He achieved rich tonal effects and textural results with a unique treatment of the copper plate.

Max Pechstein
German, 1881–1955
Follow

A key Expressionist painter of the early 20th century, Max Pechstein produced decorative and colorful paintings that borrowed from Vincent Van Gogh, Henri Matisse, and the Fauves. As a member of Die Brücke, a group of German Expressionists who took a primitivist approach to painting, Pechstein worked closely with Erich Heckel and Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. He travelled to Palau in the South Pacific in 1914, after which his paintings increasingly displayed elements of Primitivism, such as thick black lines and angular figures. Pechstein was also a prolific printmaker, making over 900 prints over the course of his career. Instrumental in founding the Novembergruppe in 1918, a left-wing artists’ group demanding artist involvement in creating social policies, Pechstein was later denounced by the Nazis and hundreds of his paintings were removed from German museums.

Pablo Picasso
Spanish, 1881–1973
Follow

A prolific and tireless innovator of art forms, Pablo Picasso impacted the course of 20th-century art with unparalleled magnitude. Inspired by African and Iberian art and developments in the world around him, Picasso contributed significantly to a number of artistic movements, notably Cubism, Surrealism, Neoclassicism, and Expressionism. Along with Georges Braque, Picasso is best known for pioneering Cubism in an attempt to reconcile three-dimensional space with the two-dimensional picture plane, once asking, “Are we to paint what’s on the face, what’s inside the face, or what’s behind it?” Responding to the Spanish Civil War, he painted his most famous work, Guernica (1937), whose violent images of anguished figures rendered in grisaille made it a definitive work of anti-war art. “Painting is not made to decorate apartments,” he said. “It’s an offensive and defensive weapon against the enemy.” Picasso’s sizable oeuvre includes over 20,000 paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, theater sets, and costume designs.

"The Blue Rider (Der Blaue Reiter)", 1912, The Second Exhibition Catalogue, Cover by Kandinsky, Published by Hans Goltz Munich, RARE, 1912

Print on paper
5 9/10 × 4 7/10 in
15 × 12 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$2,500
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Free shipping worldwide
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
Secure payment
Secure transactions by credit card through Stripe.
Learn more.
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
Other works from ARTephemera (1930-present)
Other works by Wassily Kandinsky
Other works from VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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