Wayne Thiebaud, ‘Cased Slice’, 2008, Sotheby's: Contemporary Art Day Auction

From the Catalogue

"Then, the sweet everydayness of his cake and pie pictures looked like cousins of Andy Warhol’s soup cans. But where Warhol was cool and ironic, Thiebaud was warm and gently comic, playing on a collective nostalgia just this side of sentimentality. He pushed himself as a painter—experimenting with brushstrokes, color, composition, light and shadow. The cylindrical cakes and cones of ice cream owed more to such masters of the still life as the 18th century French painter Chardin, or the 20th century Italian Giorgio Morandi, as critics have pointed out, than to the art trends of the time." —Cathleen McGuigan, "Thiebaud is Not a Pop Artist," Smithsonian Magazine, February 2011

Courtesy of Sotheby's

Signature: signed and dated '08

Paul Thiebaud Gallery, San Francisco
Acquired from the above by the present owner

About Wayne Thiebaud

Best known for his paintings of cakes, pies, pastries, and toys, Wayne Thiebaud hadn’t planned on becoming a visual artist. He apprenticed as a cartoonist at Walt Disney studios and intended to work as a commercial illustrator, but his friend Robert Mallary turned him towards a career in fine art. Thiebaud was friendly with Franz Kline and Willem de Kooning, but avoided their Abstract Expressionism in favor of a figural style. Though Thiebaud is most often grouped with the Pop art movement for his subject matter, the artist considers himself “just an old fashioned painter,” and “not a card carrying Pop artist.” He remains best known for his still lifes of confections—sometimes painted from his own memories—which he considers interpretations of “Americanness.” In his works, objects and their shadows are characteristically outlined in multiple colors, creating a visual effect Thiebaud calls akin to vibration.

American, b. 1920, Mesa, Arizona, based in San Francisco, California