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Below the Surface - ROSEGALLERY
In past show

Printed in 2002

Medium
Signature
Signed in ink in the margin; lettered 'C/D', dated, annotated 'Mississippi' in an unidentified hand in ink and Eggleston Artistic Trust …

Native Southerner William Eggleston's photographs monumentalize everyday subject matter, such as motel rooms and storefronts, in eccentric, refined compositions. Each detail is important, potentially carrying beauty and mystery. The main catalyst for New American Color Photography, Eggleston is largely credited with legitimizing color photography (especially with the dye transfer process) as a fine art form. Teaching himself from books of prints by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Frank, he began photographing his environment in the 1950s but turned to color, then used largely only commercially, in the late 1960s. Eggleston's 1976 "Color Photographs" show at the Museum of Modern Art was groundbreaking for its striking, saturated color but also for his observational style, often deemed "democratic."

Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2020
William EgglestonDavid Zwirner
2016
William Eggleston: PortraitsNational Portrait Gallery
2015
William Eggleston, From Black and White to ColorMusée de l'Elysée
View all

Untitled, Sumner, Mississippi, ca. 1970

Dye Transfer Print
22 1/2 × 19 1/8 in
57.2 × 48.6 cm
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Location
Los Angeles
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Printed in 2002

Medium
Signature
Signed in ink in the margin; lettered 'C/D', dated, annotated 'Mississippi' in an unidentified hand in ink and Eggleston Artistic Trust …

Native Southerner William Eggleston's photographs monumentalize everyday subject matter, such as motel rooms and storefronts, in eccentric, refined compositions. Each detail is important, potentially carrying beauty and mystery. The main catalyst for New American Color Photography, Eggleston is largely credited with legitimizing color photography (especially with the dye transfer process) as a fine art form. Teaching himself from books of prints by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Frank, he began photographing his environment in the 1950s but turned to color, then used largely only commercially, in the late 1960s. Eggleston's 1976 "Color Photographs" show at the Museum of Modern Art was groundbreaking for its striking, saturated color but also for his observational style, often deemed "democratic."

Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Series by this artist

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Other works by William Eggleston
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