Medium
Signature
Hand-signed by artist
Frame
Included

In his drawings and animations, William Kentridge articulates the concerns of post-Apartheid South Africa with unparalleled nuance and lyricism. In the inventive process by which he created his best-known works, Kentridge draws and erases with charcoal, recording his compositions at each state. He then displays a video projection of the looped images alongside their highly worked and re-worked source drawings. In this way, his process and aesthetic concerns are inextricably linked with the narrative power of his work, as in his “Nine Drawings for Projection” series (1989-2003), which depicts two fictional white South Africans navigating the ambiguities of contemporary South Africa. With his highly personal and often quiet works in seeming tension with the brutality of his content, Kentridge expresses a profound ambivalence about his native country.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Lincoln Center Vera List Art Project
Selected exhibitions
2019
Why Should I Hesitate:Putting Drawings To WorkZeitz MOCAA
2018
William Kentridge: The Head and The LoadTate Britain
2016
William Kentridge: Thick TimeWhitechapel Gallery
View all

Untitled (Whispering in the Leaves), 2016

Indian ink on found paper
43 1/10 × 49 in
109.5 × 124.5 cm
.
Sold
Location
Johannesburg, Cape Town, London, East Hampton
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Medium
Signature
Hand-signed by artist
Frame
Included

In his drawings and animations, William Kentridge articulates the concerns of post-Apartheid South Africa with unparalleled nuance and lyricism. In the inventive process by which he created his best-known works, Kentridge draws and erases with charcoal, recording his compositions at each state. He then displays a video projection of the looped images alongside their highly worked and re-worked source drawings. In this way, his process and aesthetic concerns are inextricably linked with the narrative power of his work, as in his “Nine Drawings for Projection” series (1989-2003), which depicts two fictional white South Africans navigating the ambiguities of contemporary South Africa. With his highly personal and often quiet works in seeming tension with the brutality of his content, Kentridge expresses a profound ambivalence about his native country.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Lincoln Center Vera List Art Project
Selected exhibitions (3)

Series by this artist

Other works from South South: Everything fits our daily needs
Other works by William Kentridge
Other works from Goodman Gallery
Related works