G8 No. 17

Latta’s paintings have a distinctive sculptural quality to them, not only in their form but in their quality of movement and suspension. The slightly non-rectangular form of the paintings’ edges give the simulation of melting or draping, depending on the angle of the light hitting the work.

About William Latta

William Latta’s paintings have a distinctive sculptural quality to them, not in the shape of specific objects but rather in their capturing of movement and suspension. The slightly non-rectangular form of the paintings’ edges give the simulation of melting or draping, depending on the angle of the light hitting the work. Latta’s recent paintings, which as late as 2011 were incredibly massive in size, are now much smaller in scale, but are arguably his most commanding works by far. He shapes by growing layers of acrylic—the magnified embodiment of paint oozing out on to a palette—to reveal the work for what it is, a means of celebrating painting for the sake of painting.

American, b. 1982, Lansing, Michigan, based in Brooklyn, New York